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by Bob Cook, Forbes Magazine Contributor

Your child concentrated on one sport from an early age, you spent a lot of money to give him or her the best coaches and biggest advantages, and you did it — you beat the odds, and your child is one of the 2 percent of high school athletes that got an offer to play competitively at a college that offers athletic scholarships.

Guess what? You’re still paying big bucks to send your kid to college. NCAA rules, designed to spread talent more evenly across schools, limits scholarships for every sport, and except for a few sports (football, men’s and women’s basketball, notably), nobody gets a full ride from day one. Often they don’t even get that in year four.

And yet even though the information on scholarship limits is widely available, parents continue to find themselves shocked that the thousands upon thousands upon thousands of dollars they spent on sports isn’t making a big dent in their college costs — that is, if they’re even lucky enough for their child to have survived the youth sports process uninjured and mentally unscathed.

I would highly recommend any sports parent — especially those who have younger children, and who have designs on them having a sports career — read this great piece in by Brad Wolverton in The Chronicle of Higher Education called “The Myth of the Sports Scholarship.” The piece concentrates on Allison Goldblatt, an Annadale, Va., native who showed great promise in swimming at an early age, and has concentrated on that sport since age 7. Now it’s time for her hard work to be rewarded with a scholarship. Except…

NCAA institutions treat athletic aid as a kind of coupon off the cost of college, rewarding athletes with the most value — including football and basketball players, whose sports bring in the most money — with the best deals.

Division I college swim teams, [Allison's coach, Pete] Morgan told his swimmers, are allowed to give the equivalent of 14 scholarships for women and 9.9 for men. Most college teams have about 30 female and 30 male swimmers.

Coaches typically give the most money to the swimmers with the potential to score the most points for their teams. That means that a dozen or more swimmers, Mr. Morgan said, often aren’t getting any money.

On any given team, Mr. Morgan told his group, the spectrum of aid can be vast.

“From books to full is probably how I’d put it,” he said. And in Allison’s sport, there are far more athletes on book scholarships, which can amount to a few hundred dollars, than full scholarships.

Wolverton followed Allison and her family as they talked to top programs, negotiating what kind of money they could get, which didn’t come close to the cost of school, assuming schools would even commit to a number, or even remember who she was and where she was from. As any parent seeking any scholarship — academic or athletic — knows, the process is difficult and demoralizing. And I know: I have a son who is sophomore at Ohio University, and a daughter who is planning to start next year at the University of Iowa.

I encourage you to read Wolverton’s story not as a knock on Allison and her parents, but as a cautionary tale on spending now with the assumption that scholarship money will come later. As always, if your child loves a sport and wants to spend a lot of time on it, and it doesn’t create an issue in your family, then go for it. But if you’re having your kid concentrate on a sport just for a scholarship, don’t.

You might be surprised — your child could get a pretty good scholarship following his or her own interests, picking a school that fits his or her needs. And I know: my son at Ohio is on a full-ride Army ROTC scholarship, and my daughter at Iowa, planning to major in microbiology and public health, already got the maximum scholarship you can receive for getting accepted. Hey, it’s my blog! I can brag! But what they both have in common is their pursuits can with no pushing from me — that, in fact, I understand them so little it’s best I stay out of the way.
Thanks Scope.. just wasted 2 'mins of my life reading that
[quote=Anonymous]Thanks Scope.. just wasted 2 'mins of my life reading that [/quote


Why so negative..:.
wasted 2 minutes of your life/
why would you say something so stupid?
the person who posted that article is doing a service. if you are in denial, that's on you.
Actually a good read and a very cautionary tail for those going thru the process today. The 2 minute time waster likely either in denial or one of the ones whose daughter got the offer for books or low percentage, but turned that into a full ride by the time he hit the sidelines or first cocktail party after she committed.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Actually a good read and a very cautionary tail for those going thru the process today. The 2 minute time waster likely either in denial or one of the ones whose daughter got the offer for books or low percentage, but turned that into a full ride by the time he hit the sidelines or first cocktail party after she committed.


I totally doubt his/her kid got a full ride...while the "full" part is right, I would exchange the term, Full Ride to "Full of [lacrosse]"!!
someone that stupid probably can't even read much less read it in 2 minutes. whatta tool.
It took me 3 minutes
Take from it what you will
IMO definitely worth the few minutes it took to read
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Take from it what you will
IMO definitely worth the few minutes it took to read


Well, I would say it depends on the Athelete, my son is getting most of tuition paid at a big 10, he would not be able to attend without the Athletic money. The kids I know who are going to Ivies are also are making out huge if the family salary is low enough, (under 200k)
My son will be getting 150k to play lacrosse at a school we would not be able to afford or be academically accepted too.
Do not really know why BTC would is writing this.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son will be getting 150k to play lacrosse at a school we would not be able to afford or be academically accepted too.
Do not really know why BTC would is writing this.


...and the name of that school is?
Since Lacrosse scholarships are divided up, even though this is an anonymous forum, it is frowned upon to discuss in detail which school, which kid , etc. my son has been running in the elite circuit of HS players for a few years now, and I can assure you all that a few boys are getting nearly a full ride,. But most decent players gets out 25% which Is considered a good lacrosse scholarship . I'm talking strictly athletic money. The Ivies give big need based grants which can also work well.
Anyone that gets .25 should be doing the happy dance. With rosters of 30-50 and with many programs not fully funded in using the allocated ncaa scholarship allotment there are many schools keeping teams and programs afloat with around 7 scholarships. Keep the grades up and hit the magic trigger scores on the sat and act. That is where most of the money is.

Everyone on this board thinks there kid is gods gift when in reality most are just good lacrosse players. Just because your club coach put you on the A team and blew smoke up your [lacrosse] doesn't mean a BS full ride is in your future. Throwing money at the sport does not equate to a big Scholarship offer. Good luck
Originally Posted by Larry Miller
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son will be getting 150k to play lacrosse at a school we would not be able to afford or be academically accepted too.
Do not really know why BTC would is writing this.


...and the name of that school is?


And he's is going to post that, and tell the entire lacrosse community his son's deal, because Larry from BOTC told him to? LOL. Plenty of money out there for the right kid at the right school. Just because the average kid isn't getting it, doesn't mean it isn't out there.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Larry Miller
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son will be getting 150k to play lacrosse at a school we would not be able to afford or be academically accepted too.
Do not really know why BTC would is writing this.


...and the name of that school is?


And he's is going to post that, and tell the entire lacrosse community his son's deal, because Larry from BOTC told him to? LOL. Plenty of money out there for the right kid at the right school. Just because the average kid isn't getting it, doesn't mean it isn't out there.


time for your meds.
The goal should be getting your kids application stamped by coaching staff...any $$$ after the fact gravy!
Originally Posted by Larry Miller
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son will be getting 150k to play lacrosse at a school we would not be able to afford or be academically accepted too.
Do not really know why BTC would is writing this.


...and the name of that school is?


Come on, a complete moron knows he won't post that info because his post is full of brown poo that comes out of a horse's [lacrosse].
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Larry Miller
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son will be getting 150k to play lacrosse at a school we would not be able to afford or be academically accepted too.
Do not really know why BTC would is writing this.


...and the name of that school is?


And he's is going to post that, and tell the entire lacrosse community his son's deal, because Larry from BOTC told him to? LOL. Plenty of money out there for the right kid at the right school. Just because the average kid isn't getting it, doesn't mean it isn't out there.


You would be surprised how many parents try to pass off aid or academic $ as a sports scholarship. One dad was adamant that his son got a lacrosse scholarship to a D3 school...
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son will be getting 150k to play lacrosse at a school we would not be able to afford or be academically accepted too.
Do not really know why BTC would is writing this.


Why would you want him at a school he is not academically qualified to be in? He will be set up for failure before he even begins. Being a college athlete is hard enough if you are a good match academically for a school but if his academics are sub par before starting, the struggle could be too much.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son will be getting 150k to play lacrosse at a school we would not be able to afford or be academically accepted too.
Do not really know why BTC would is writing this.


Why would you want him at a school he is not academically qualified to be in? He will be set up for failure before he even begins. Being a college athlete is hard enough if you are a good match academically for a school but if his academics are sub par before starting, the struggle could be too much.


Clearly you have no idea what you're talking about. Ever here of the white boy syndrome? Plenty of them get denied to the top schools for that reason. They will do fine once they get in.
I just don't believe this guy. Do the math and it's not smelling right. Need more details if you're going to post that. What conference is this school? 150K? How much yearly? Percentage.? Not passing the smell test.
just another fraud
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son will be getting 150k to play lacrosse at a school we would not be able to afford or be academically accepted too.
Do not really know why BTC would is writing this.


Why would you want him at a school he is not academically qualified to be in? He will be set up for failure before he even begins. Being a college athlete is hard enough if you are a good match academically for a school but if his academics are sub par before starting, the struggle could be too much.


Clearly you have no idea what you're talking about. Ever here of the white boy syndrome? Plenty of them get denied to the top schools for that reason. They will do fine once they get in.


Cleary you have no idea. Use some damn common sense.

1) $150K, assume this is amortized across four years - so ~ $38K a year. Most D1 programs you're looking at upwards of a 50% ride. Either this kid is an absolute, locked down home run or ... well, you know.
2) There are no 4 year guaranteed scholarships. Non revenue sport. Renewed each year. If Johnny doesn't play up to potential, good luck getting that $38K next year.
3) Not qualified academically to get in to the school he will be attending. Let that sink in some. We're not talking raced based admissions; we're talking pure academics. If you're son gets into Duke but isn't in the academic ballpark -- good luck. This isn't football/basketball. There is no pot of gold at the end of the bench for 99.99% of lax players. Academics matter. Your son will have a full time job playing lax, and another one trying to catch up in the classroom. That is a scenario set up for disaster.

Hope you prepped your kid to work just as hard in the classroom as he does on the lacrosse field. Otherwise, you can kiss that scholarship goodbye.
You lie. Lacrosse generates more money for the schools and NCAA than all other sports combined.

Of course all kids get a full ride.

Originally Posted by Anonymous
You lie. Lacrosse generates more money for the schools and NCAA than all other sports combined.

Of course all kids get a full ride.

like the sarcasm. The national title game attendance has been dropping like a rock for 12 years in a row. It's close to just being family in the stands these days. A great lacrosse game has about 200 spectators
"Most D1 programs you're looking at upwards of a 50% ride. Either this kid is an absolute, locked down home run or ... well, you know."

How do you get to 50% ride for 40+ players with 12.6 scholarships, max????
true . you know that , very few if any schools charge admission to lax games. men or women. they would love to just have the student body support.
its fairly clear that it isn't a money generating activity.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
"Most D1 programs you're looking at upwards of a 50% ride. Either this kid is an absolute, locked down home run or ... well, you know."

How do you get to 50% ride for 40+ players with 12.6 scholarships, max????


Read it again. He's saying that IF the kid was getting 150K, it would be equal to more than 50%, which is highly unlikely (to put it mildly). He is disputing the original claim.

Pretty sure the original poster just threw that out there to spin everybody up - and it worked!
Excellent read. What I don't understand is all of the people who think that the travel teams are the only way to go for a scholarship. My kid plays travel because he is good at it and he enjoys it. We are on the same team since he started, many have come and gone, but the core group is there, and he has friends all over LI now. If your kid isn't on a wall every day, running 2 miles 3 days a week, and does stuff outside of lax, there is slim to no chance to be part of the 2% that gets to play at the highest level, much less get money for it. The money is in the academics. Pay for a tutor, take the SAT classes, and get good grades. Lax should just be another notch on the application to show a well rounded student.
It is not a lie He will be getting 150k to play lacrosse.
He will do fine academically, just because he would not be able to get in without lacrosse does not me he will struggle.
In addition, he was scholarship with most of his club teams, not all.
Team policy- if you are on team original scholarship is valid- only way to lose it is being cut from team for whatever reason.
Get ready to be absolutely crushed for that post dad!
Originally Posted by Anonymous
It is not a lie He will be getting 150k to play lacrosse.
He will do fine academically, just because he would not be able to get in without lacrosse does not me he will struggle.
In addition, he was scholarship with most of his club teams, not all.
Team policy- if you are on team original scholarship is valid- only way to lose it is being cut from team for whatever reason.


I actually have a kid in a similar situation. We are talking elite game changing players. They are getting upward of 50% of total cost. The scholarships are guaranteed for all 4 years at Big 10 schools, that's in writing.
This is a great topic , Finally get the truth out. Parents reading this that's not educated on it must be spinning, lol. Now little Jonny that plays travel since 2nd grade @ $3000 a year with traveling hotels food prob more , all the private $50 an hour lessons , so your whole child's youth lacrosse program is around 50k plus ?? A good town team with good coaching and a 529 might be the way for me!!
My kid must be a stiff. Only getting 35%
Originally Posted by Anonymous
This is a great topic , Finally get the truth out. Parents reading this that's not educated on it must be spinning, lol. Now little Jonny that plays travel since 2nd grade @ $3000 a year with traveling hotels food prob more , all the private $50 an hour lessons , so your whole child's youth lacrosse program is around 50k plus ?? A good town team with good coaching and a 529 might be the way for me!!


529c is the best route for college hands down. Town team is not the best route for lacrosse unless you are lucky enough to win the town coach lotto jackpot. It happens but most of us are just dads trying to do the right thing by the kids not professional coaches. A few town teams have dads who are legit varsity/jv coaches and you'll know those ones immediately because they decimate every other team in their age group.
Any parent/family who is chasing Dollars vs Oppurtunity is delusional. We recognized (like many other parents on this board) early on that our child was an athlete. Although my son continues to play two other sports, Lacrosse was the sport we knew that he had any chance of playing at the next level. It is also the sport he enjoyed most and happens to be offered at the top academic universities. Thankfully, he is also a very good student, but let's be honest, his chances of getting into Duke, Princeton, Hopkins on academics alone are slim. Spending the "3k a yr plus travel" etc was a very calculated decision. The alumni network, the relationships, the experience and most of all the opportunities before and after college the sport of lacrosse offers our boys is the reason to spend the money. Not the potential of saving 15-20k a year on tuition. As a parent, of course we continue to encourage our son to study hard and hopefully he ultimately will have the grades to get into the school that he has "committed" to on academics as well.
good post. unfortunate that the target audience is, for the most part oblivious to any sound advice or input.
"We are talking elite game changing players"

That probably amounts to literally a handful of athletes per graduating year! Those athletes or their parents are not in need of advice on a BOTC fourm - please! For the 99.999% of all other players are just plain old elite, non of this applies, and you are back to 12.6 scholarships per 40+ players.
Originally Posted by Anonymous


...

3) Not qualified academically to get in to the school he will be attending. Let that sink in some. We're not talking raced based admissions; we're talking pure academics. If you're son gets into Duke but isn't in the academic ballpark -- good luck. This isn't football/basketball. There is no pot of gold at the end of the bench for 99.99% of lax players. Academics matter. Your son will have a full time job playing lax, and another one trying to catch up in the classroom. That is a scenario set up for disaster.

Hope you prepped your kid to work just as hard in the classroom as he does on the lacrosse field. Otherwise, you can kiss that scholarship goodbye.


A lacrosse player with a 1400 SAT and top 5% HS GPA is most certainly capable of succeeding at any school in the country outside of maybe Caltech. Without lacrosse, however, this student has a zero percent chance of admittance to any of the non-Cornell Ivies, and pretty rough odds at the other top 25 schools.

Your third point (copied/pasted above) is bullsh*t for the vast majority of kids.
Just sharing our experience for everyone's benefit. My son who is a 2019 had four schools "recruiting" him this summer after two others had invited him for visits over last winter. He received an initial offer from one of the winter interested but we decided it was too early in the process and he wanted to look at more schools and see what he liked. He played well over the summer and we visited 6 schools and received 4 offers with two saying they wanted to take it slow and see how Fall went. My son decided on his top 3 schools and after doing plenty of research and speaking with people who have been through the process we went back to each coach with an update on who he was receiving offers from. His number one choice decided to increase his offer to a number that equals ~1/3 of the total cost of attending. He gladly accepted. I hope this helps someone in their process.
Thank you for the info. Congratulations! From your perspective of having gone through the process - does an offer usually come during the campus visit? Can you give us sense of what type of schools these were?
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Thank you for the info. Congratulations! From your perspective of having gone through the process - does an offer usually come during the campus visit? Can you give us sense of what type of schools these were?


All D1 schools, half in top 25, other half in top 40(?) for lacrosse and top 75 in terms of academics. Some offers were proffered at the conclusion of the visit on campus, others came via the phone after the visit. A few coaches said "let us know when you receive an offer..." Which he did and then they jumped in with their offer. There were also 2-3 D3 schools that expressed interest but he wanted to explore D1 first so we didn't visit. I hope that helps.

Would you rather play lacrosse at UNC and get a degree in basket weaving because you were unqualified or unable to take a monster major or go to some weaker cheaper state school and get an engineering degree if that's what you want to do?

Different answers for different families. Its not always black and white
My son is going to choose MIT and be the star on their lax team. Hopefully Bill Gates will notice him.
and hopefully nail, oops I mean network, with rich Asian girls and convent yen into dollars
Smart!
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son is going to choose MIT and be the star on their lax team. Hopefully Bill Gates will notice him.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
and hopefully nail, oops I mean network, with rich Asian girls and convent yen into dollars
Smart!
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son is going to choose MIT and be the star on their lax team. Hopefully Bill Gates will notice him.


Who needs to pay 3k per year to clubs if I can get my son on the MIT team and have more fun in college?
Middle 50% score range of admitted students (25th and 75th percentiles): Came in 2016

SAT Reasoning Test - Math [760, 800]
SAT Reasoning Test - Critical Reading [710, 800]
SAT Reasoning Test - Writing [700, 790]
ACT Math [34, 36]
ACT English [33, 35]
ACT Composite [33, 35]
SAT Subject Test - Math [780, 800]
SAT Subject Test - Science [740, 800]

There is at least 3k a year just in test prep.

Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
and hopefully nail, oops I mean network, with rich Asian girls and convent yen into dollars
Smart!
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son is going to choose MIT and be the star on their lax team. Hopefully Bill Gates will notice him.


Who needs to pay 3k per year to clubs if I can get my son on the MIT team and have more fun in college?
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Middle 50% score range of admitted students (25th and 75th percentiles): Came in 2016

SAT Reasoning Test - Math [760, 800]
SAT Reasoning Test - Critical Reading [710, 800]
SAT Reasoning Test - Writing [700, 790]
ACT Math [34, 36]
ACT English [33, 35]
ACT Composite [33, 35]
SAT Subject Test - Math [780, 800]
SAT Subject Test - Science [740, 800]

There is at least 3k a year just in test prep.

Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
and hopefully nail, oops I mean network, with rich Asian girls and convent yen into dollars
Smart!
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son is going to choose MIT and be the star on their lax team. Hopefully Bill Gates will notice him.


Who needs to pay 3k per year to clubs if I can get my son on the MIT team and have more fun in college?


So... do I need to pay 6k (3k club lax and 3k tutor)?
Does Channy offer both?
this thread has been a real wake up call for me and I feel so stupid and used by the system.

I had been so naive about summer lacrosse and raising my son, I had been lead to believe that club lacrosse was about having fun, making new friends, playing for new or different coaches and maybe at the end of the day becoming good enough at the sport to maybe improve his chances of getting into a better college than he would have without lacrosse.

I now realize (thanks to the posts on BOTC) that it is all about return on investment and the only quantifiable answer to "was it worth it?" is how big an athletic scholarship he received.

Now looking back, I wish I had not spent all that time in the car with my son, all that time meeting new people and watching my son enjoy himself playing the sport he loved when I could have been at home reading a book while he played xbox or hung out with his friends.

We are all fools to allow our kids to play travel sports and spend so much time with them when they so clearly could be doing something else with there lives.

shame on us.
Good one!
Originally Posted by Anonymous
this thread has been a real wake up call for me and I feel so stupid and used by the system.

I had been so naive about summer lacrosse and raising my son, I had been lead to believe that club lacrosse was about having fun, making new friends, playing for new or different coaches and maybe at the end of the day becoming good enough at the sport to maybe improve his chances of getting into a better college than he would have without lacrosse.

I now realize (thanks to the posts on BOTC) that it is all about return on investment and the only quantifiable answer to "was it worth it?" is how big an athletic scholarship he received.

Now looking back, I wish I had not spent all that time in the car with my son, all that time meeting new people and watching my son enjoy himself playing the sport he loved when I could have been at home reading a book while he played xbox or hung out with his friends.

We are all fools to allow our kids to play travel sports and spend so much time with them when they so clearly could be doing something else with there lives.

shame on us.
While I do appreciate most of your sarcasm, the fact is, the combination of both a grade based system with the recent emphasis on early recruiting has in fact spoiled the summer travel game for many. And it's really not about what summer travel sports should be, as you correctly point out.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
this thread has been a real wake up call for me and I feel so stupid and used by the system.

I had been so naive about summer lacrosse and raising my son, I had been lead to believe that club lacrosse was about having fun, making new friends, playing for new or different coaches and maybe at the end of the day becoming good enough at the sport to maybe improve his chances of getting into a better college than he would have without lacrosse.

I now realize (thanks to the posts on BOTC) that it is all about return on investment and the only quantifiable answer to "was it worth it?" is how big an athletic scholarship he received.

Now looking back, I wish I had not spent all that time in the car with my son, all that time meeting new people and watching my son enjoy himself playing the sport he loved when I could have been at home reading a book while he played xbox or hung out with his friends.

We are all fools to allow our kids to play travel sports and spend so much time with them when they so clearly could be doing something else with there lives.

shame on us.
While I do appreciate most of your sarcasm, the fact is, the combination of both a grade based system with the recent emphasis on early recruiting has in fact spoiled the summer travel game for many. And it's really not about what summer travel sports should be, as you correctly point out.
I have picked up on a divide in Club/travel lax. It used to be just Rec and Club, but there is actually Rec, Club, and Recruiting Club. This structure is widely supported buy the Club population, as many clubs strive for if not exist for getting kids in a recruiting groove (Recruiting Club). Other Clubs like to have teams to go and compete in tournaments where there will be few if any coaches, and these kids want to play at a higher level and be with friends (Club). Then there is good ole Rec.
UNC is a state school. In state tuition is $8,500


Originally Posted by Anonymous
Would you rather play lacrosse at UNC and get a degree in basket weaving because you were unqualified or unable to take a monster major or go to some weaker cheaper state school and get an engineering degree if that's what you want to do?

Different answers for different families. Its not always black and white
Please post anonymously what your committed son received in scholarship money and approximate % of overall costs. That would be helpful to all those who will go through the process.

2019 $20k 30%
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Please post anonymously what your committed son received in scholarship money and approximate % of overall costs. That would be helpful to all those who will go through the process.

2019 $20k 30%



Does it have to be only sons? My daughter got:
2016 Athletic + Academic $40k 66%
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
this thread has been a real wake up call for me and I feel so stupid and used by the system.

I had been so naive about summer lacrosse and raising my son, I had been lead to believe that club lacrosse was about having fun, making new friends, playing for new or different coaches and maybe at the end of the day becoming good enough at the sport to maybe improve his chances of getting into a better college than he would have without lacrosse.

I now realize (thanks to the posts on BOTC) that it is all about return on investment and the only quantifiable answer to "was it worth it?" is how big an athletic scholarship he received.

Now looking back, I wish I had not spent all that time in the car with my son, all that time meeting new people and watching my son enjoy himself playing the sport he loved when I could have been at home reading a book while he played xbox or hung out with his friends.

We are all fools to allow our kids to play travel sports and spend so much time with them when they so clearly could be doing something else with there lives.

shame on us.
While I do appreciate most of your sarcasm, the fact is, the combination of both a grade based system with the recent emphasis on early recruiting has in fact spoiled the summer travel game for many. And it's really not about what summer travel sports should be, as you correctly point out.
I have picked up on a divide in Club/travel lax. It used to be just Rec and Club, but there is actually Rec, Club, and Recruiting Club. This structure is widely supported buy the Club population, as many clubs strive for if not exist for getting kids in a recruiting groove (Recruiting Club). Other Clubs like to have teams to go and compete in tournaments where there will be few if any coaches, and these kids want to play at a higher level and be with friends (Club). Then there is good ole Rec.


It's not that clear - when there are club teams that you would label just "club" that have over 20+ boys, with almost a 1/3 going to D I schools in the last 2 years, that oversimplification just doesn't hold up. And that's just one club!
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Please post anonymously what your committed son received in scholarship money and approximate % of overall costs. That would be helpful to all those who will go through the process.

2019 $20k 30%


estimated academic $20k-$25k + Athletic $22k ='s approx tuition
$15,000 athletic + $10,000 academic = $15,000 out of pocket, had better offers but loved the school and coach
28,000 Athletic at Big 10, guaranteed for all 4 years.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
UNC is a state school. In state tuition is $8,500


Originally Posted by Anonymous
Would you rather play lacrosse at UNC and get a degree in basket weaving because you were unqualified or unable to take a monster major or go to some weaker cheaper state school and get an engineering degree if that's what you want to do?

Different answers for different families. Its not always black and white


I imagine most are out-of-state for UNC as their current roster only has about three kids from NC...out-of-state tuition is roughly $33,500. Not sure if the 12.6 scholarships is based on in-state or out-of-state rates, but I'm assuming in-state.

We took part in a play-in day/tour at UNC two weeks ago and loved the facilities, staff and overall atmosphere, but for the lucky (very) few who will ever get to contemplate going there, it isn't cheap. If my kid is fortunate enough to be able to play at the college level, we're not expecting any real money for lax.

The percentages people have mentioned in the past few posts look impressive and they're doing well to get that. A friend who has a kid playing at Denver isn't getting that kind of money.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
UNC is a state school. In state tuition is $8,500


[quote=Anonymous]Would you rather play lacrosse at UNC and get a degree in basket weaving because you were unqualified or unable to take a monster major or go to some weaker cheaper state school and get an engineering degree if that's what you want to do?

Different answers for different families. Its not always black and white


I imagine most are out-of-state for UNC as their current roster only has about three kids from NC...out-of-state tuition is roughly $33,500. Not sure if the 12.6 scholarships is based on in-state or out-of-state rates, but I'm assuming in-state.

We took part in a play-in day/tour at UNC two weeks ago and loved the facilities, staff and overall atmosphere, but for the lucky (very) few who will ever get to contemplate going there, it isn't cheap. If my kid is fortunate enough to be able to play at the college level, we're not expecting any real money for lax.

The percentages people have mentioned in the past few posts look impressive and they're doing well to get that. A friend who has a kid playing at Denver isn't getting that kind of money.

25K per year at UNC guaranteed. Top 4 in class player
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
UNC is a state school. In state tuition is $8,500


[quote=Anonymous]Would you rather play lacrosse at UNC and get a degree in basket weaving because you were unqualified or unable to take a monster major or go to some weaker cheaper state school and get an engineering degree if that's what you want to do?

Different answers for different families. Its not always black and white


I imagine most are out-of-state for UNC as their current roster only has about three kids from NC...out-of-state tuition is roughly $33,500. Not sure if the 12.6 scholarships is based on in-state or out-of-state rates, but I'm assuming in-state.

We took part in a play-in day/tour at UNC two weeks ago and loved the facilities, staff and overall atmosphere, but for the lucky (very) few who will ever get to contemplate going there, it isn't cheap. If my kid is fortunate enough to be able to play at the college level, we're not expecting any real money for lax.

The percentages people have mentioned in the past few posts look impressive and they're doing well to get that. A friend who has a kid playing at Denver isn't getting that kind of money.

25K per year at UNC guaranteed. Top 4 in class player


State schools can and do offer in-state tuitiion waivers as part of their packages.
Many kids are receiving nothing, ZERO financial assistance and still committing to D1 programs. The vast majority of the players that do receive scholarship money are in the $10k-15K. $10k being the most common.

I hope this helps.
Common denominator with all of UNCs early commits - you guessed it - all reclassed. Enjoy your phony classes!
this is from [lacrosse] - Ivy League - military academy's not included in stats and it noted that some teams are not fully funded

Mens D1
70 teams
3137 participants
avg roster size 45
scholarships allowed 12.6
avg. scholarship $14,151


Originally Posted by Anonymous
Common denominator with all of UNCs early commits - you guessed it - all reclassed. Enjoy your phony classes!


What is reclassed? DeCommitred?
Reclassed is the politically correct term for hold back.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Common denominator with all of UNCs early commits - you guessed it - all reclassed. Enjoy your phony classes!


Phony or not, their strategy, for whatever motivation, has paid off.
They have an opportunity to participate in a high level program with high level academics.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
this is from [lacrosse] - Ivy League - military academy's not included in stats and it noted that some teams are not fully funded

Mens D1
70 teams
3137 participants
avg roster size 45
scholarships allowed 12.6
avg. scholarship $14,151



So lets say tuition is $45k
$45k x 45 roster = $2.0m
12.6 scholarships x $45k = $567k
$567k / 45 players = $12,600 per player
$1.4m per year is unfunded

If the average award is $14,151 then probably the bottom third of all "committed roster players" GET NOTHING!

And $45k is cheap. My kid is looking at $60k schools so hit the books if you want any real money
Reclass is when u have your child repeat a grade so he has an extra year and is bigger and stronger than the rest in his grade.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Common denominator with all of UNCs early commits - you guessed it - all reclassed. Enjoy your phony classes!


Phony or not, their strategy, for whatever motivation, has paid off.
They have an opportunity to participate in a high level program with high level academics.


It has not paid off yet. They have 3 year to go and things can change. Grades may not meet expectations and/or the late bloomers may surpass them. If there are better players three years from now, those players will be replaced. There is nothing in writing.
Eight years of travel lacrosse, hundreds or weekends, thousands of miles and tens of thousands of dollars has paid off! My son has just received partial offers from Capella, West Governors University and University of Phoenix!
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
this is from [lacrosse] - Ivy League - military academy's not included in stats and it noted that some teams are not fully funded

Mens D1
70 teams
3137 participants
avg roster size 45
scholarships allowed 12.6
avg. scholarship $14,151



So lets say tuition is $45k
$45k x 45 roster = $2.0m
12.6 scholarships x $45k = $567k
$567k / 45 players = $12,600 per player
$1.4m per year is unfunded

If the average award is $14,151 then probably the bottom third of all "committed roster players" GET NOTHING!

And $45k is cheap. My kid is looking at $60k schools so hit the books if you want any real money


Or another way to look at it - only 28% (12.6 / 45) of the average team's costs are covered by athletic scholarships. And for every stud that gets more, everyone else gets less.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Reclassed is the politically correct term for hold back.
Or a player did a PG year at a Prep School,
which honestly doesn't bother me as much as the players who reclassify in 8th/9th grade just for lacrosse & early recruiting.
But does look like 75% of the 54 kids on the UNC 2017 roster have a prep school listed.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
this is from [lacrosse] - Ivy League - military academy's not included in stats and it noted that some teams are not fully funded

Mens D1
70 teams
3137 participants
avg roster size 45
scholarships allowed 12.6
avg. scholarship $14,151



So lets say tuition is $45k
$45k x 45 roster = $2.0m
12.6 scholarships x $45k = $567k
$567k / 45 players = $12,600 per player
$1.4m per year is unfunded

If the average award is $14,151 then probably the bottom third of all "committed roster players" GET NOTHING!

And $45k is cheap. My kid is looking at $60k schools so hit the books if you want any real money


Or another way to look at it - only 28% (12.6 / 45) of the average team's costs are covered by athletic scholarships. And for every stud that gets more, everyone else gets less.
Keeping with UNC is our example the 2017 roster has 54 players listed, 9 red-shirted (mostly sophs & jrs), so I'm guessing lose athletic money if red-shirted?
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


bingo! get in, quit and focus on internships
They live lacrosse, your son doesn't
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


bingo! get in, quit and focus on internships


I you are not a top 1 percenter, go for low D1, D2 or D3 very different there and not the 5-6 hours a day that top schools practice. Or go to a monster school and play club lax. At those schools the club team will beat most bottom D1 teams it is super competitive but only travel on the weekends
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Kids at Ivies, those who need it at least, are getting tons of financial help -- it just isn't tied to lacrosse. And the Ivy League schools have pretty strict rules regarding things like commitment during the off-season and weekly limits on practice time. It's a shame that all schools don't do the same. There's no reason why a dead-end, non-revenue sport should ever be a full-time job (which it is for many).

The NESCAC schools are pretty good about this too.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Kids at Ivies, those who need it at least, are getting tons of financial help -- it just isn't tied to lacrosse. And the Ivy League schools have pretty strict rules regarding things like commitment during the off-season and weekly limits on practice time. It's a shame that all schools don't do the same. There's no reason why a dead-end, non-revenue sport should ever be a full-time job (which it is for many).

The NESCAC schools are pretty good about this too.


Yes, I know you get financial help at the Ivies, but you need to have limited assets and a combined salary well under 200k. This is rare for lax players. Every student who attends these schools is treated the same when it comes to aid. It's strictly need based. The lacrosse is what gets you in. Once you're there if you hate it, or its interfering with academic, quit. You won't be losing anything.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Kids at Ivies, those who need it at least, are getting tons of financial help -- it just isn't tied to lacrosse. And the Ivy League schools have pretty strict rules regarding things like commitment during the off-season and weekly limits on practice time. It's a shame that all schools don't do the same. There's no reason why a dead-end, non-revenue sport should ever be a full-time job (which it is for many).

The NESCAC schools are pretty good about this too.


Yes, I know you get financial help at the Ivies, but you need to have limited assets and a combined salary well under 200k. This is rare for lax players. Every student who attends these schools is treated the same when it comes to aid. It's strictly need based. The lacrosse is what gets you in. Once you're there if you hate it, or its interfering with academic, quit. You won't be losing anything.


How about you 10 fortunate ivy league parents meet for coffee someplace because ivies don't apply to 99.5 of us with or without lacrosse and I'm pretty sure the people typing about ivies have their kids headed to some weak college none of us ever heard of
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Kids at Ivies, those who need it at least, are getting tons of financial help -- it just isn't tied to lacrosse. And the Ivy League schools have pretty strict rules regarding things like commitment during the off-season and weekly limits on practice time. It's a shame that all schools don't do the same. There's no reason why a dead-end, non-revenue sport should ever be a full-time job (which it is for many).

The NESCAC schools are pretty good about this too.


Yes, I know you get financial help at the Ivies, but you need to have limited assets and a combined salary well under 200k. This is rare for lax players. Every student who attends these schools is treated the same when it comes to aid. It's strictly need based. The lacrosse is what gets you in. Once you're there if you hate it, or its interfering with academic, quit. You won't be losing anything.


How about you 10 fortunate ivy league parents meet for coffee someplace because ivies don't apply to 99.5 of us with or without lacrosse and I'm pretty sure the people typing about ivies have their kids headed to some weak college none of us ever heard of


It's roughly ten percent of D1 players, so we're not talking about an insignificant number here. There's nothing wrong with discussing the Ivies on a D1 lacrosse message board, especially since the recruiting process for them is a bit different than it is for other schools.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
good post. unfortunate that the target audience is, for the most part oblivious to any sound advice or input.


You can tell that just by reading some if these responses. These people are delusional and drinking the cool-aide that the clubs are serving them. I have been through it with two already, one of which won an NCAA ring playing lax. Tell your kids to play hard and have fun and push the academics. Lacrosse may help get into a good school if the academics are there but that's about it. I cant tell you how many boys I know that may early commitments to schools that were not a good fit and ended up transferring after one or two semesters.
If your son loves lacrosse use it as a tool to get where they want to go but don't count on getting more than money to pay for books.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Just sharing our experience for everyone's benefit. My son who is a 2019 had four schools "recruiting" him this summer after two others had invited him for visits over last winter. He received an initial offer from one of the winter interested but we decided it was too early in the process and he wanted to look at more schools and see what he liked. He played well over the summer and we visited 6 schools and received 4 offers with two saying they wanted to take it slow and see how Fall went. My son decided on his top 3 schools and after doing plenty of research and speaking with people who have been through the process we went back to each coach with an update on who he was receiving offers from. His number one choice decided to increase his offer to a number that equals ~1/3 of the total cost of attending. He gladly accepted. I hope this helps someone in their process.


This is a realistic scenario for a very good lacrosse player. Thank you for bringing some sanity to this thread and good luck to you son.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Great post. My oldest played at a D2 school, Received some athletic money but three times as much academic money. Won the D2 championship his sophomore season, got his ring and stopped playing. He was on the verge of losing his academic money because his grades were suffering. Playing a varsity sport in college s a full time job and many of these kids don't realize the time they will have to commit once they are there. After stopping playing my son concentrated on his studies and graduated with a 3.8GPA and a degree in his major in 4 years. he probably would have needed more years and not had as high a GPA if he had continued to play.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Kids at Ivies, those who need it at least, are getting tons of financial help -- it just isn't tied to lacrosse. And the Ivy League schools have pretty strict rules regarding things like commitment during the off-season and weekly limits on practice time. It's a shame that all schools don't do the same. There's no reason why a dead-end, non-revenue sport should ever be a full-time job (which it is for many).

Ivies all claim their money is all need based, not merit.

The NESCAC schools are pretty good about this too.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Great post. My oldest played at a D2 school, Received some athletic money but three times as much academic money. Won the D2 championship his sophomore season, got his ring and stopped playing. He was on the verge of losing his academic money because his grades were suffering. Playing a varsity sport in college s a full time job and many of these kids don't realize the time they will have to commit once they are there. After stopping playing my son concentrated on his studies and graduated with a 3.8GPA and a degree in his major in 4 years. he probably would have needed more years and not had as high a GPA if he had continued to play.


I'm calling BS on your post... I guess math is not your strong suit. If your son was almost losing his academic money his GPA was sub 3.0 (more likely in the 2.4 range to lose academic money) after freshman or sophomore year, and graduated in 4 years (lets assume 30 credit hours per year) there is no way he could achieve a 3.8 GPA, even if he got a 4.0 for 3 years in a row (and you said he quite after his sophomore year in danger of losing his academic money.) I guess he told you he had a 3.8 GPA and you believed it.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Great post. My oldest played at a D2 school, Received some athletic money but three times as much academic money. Won the D2 championship his sophomore season, got his ring and stopped playing. He was on the verge of losing his academic money because his grades were suffering. Playing a varsity sport in college s a full time job and many of these kids don't realize the time they will have to commit once they are there. After stopping playing my son concentrated on his studies and graduated with a 3.8GPA and a degree in his major in 4 years. he probably would have needed more years and not had as high a GPA if he had continued to play.


I'm calling BS on your post... I guess math is not your strong suit. If your son was almost losing his academic money his GPA was sub 3.0 (more likely in the 2.4 range to lose academic money) after freshman or sophomore year, and graduated in 4 years (lets assume 30 credit hours per year) there is no way he could achieve a 3.8 GPA, even if he got a 4.0 for 3 years in a row (and you said he quite after his sophomore year in danger of losing his academic money.) I guess he told you he had a 3.8 GPA and you believed it.


Not sure that is true - my older son (not participating in any NCAA athletics, but don;t this that is relevant to this discussion) has aid contingent based upon his maintaining a 3.2 GPA - so, I am sure there are varying requirements for different types of aid as well as differences between instituion.

Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Great post. My oldest played at a D2 school, Received some athletic money but three times as much academic money. Won the D2 championship his sophomore season, got his ring and stopped playing. He was on the verge of losing his academic money because his grades were suffering. Playing a varsity sport in college s a full time job and many of these kids don't realize the time they will have to commit once they are there. After stopping playing my son concentrated on his studies and graduated with a 3.8GPA and a degree in his major in 4 years. he probably would have needed more years and not had as high a GPA if he had continued to play.


I'm calling BS on your post... I guess math is not your strong suit. If your son was almost losing his academic money his GPA was sub 3.0 (more likely in the 2.4 range to lose academic money) after freshman or sophomore year, and graduated in 4 years (lets assume 30 credit hours per year) there is no way he could achieve a 3.8 GPA, even if he got a 4.0 for 3 years in a row (and you said he quite after his sophomore year in danger of losing his academic money.) I guess he told you he had a 3.8 GPA and you believed it.


Not sure that is true - my older son (not participating in any NCAA athletics, but don;t this that is relevant to this discussion) has aid contingent based upon his maintaining a 3.2 GPA - so, I am sure there are varying requirements for different types of aid as well as differences between instituion.


The math still does not work..... Even if the student got a 3.5 thru his sophomore year (he would not be in danger of losing his $$ at that GPA level, so not sure what his actual GPA would be if he was on the bubble at his university) and then got a 4.0 his last 4 semesters the best he could reasonably achieve is a 3.75 GPA. This does not even factor in that upper level classes generally get much tougher than gen ed requirement intro / survey classes (that most Freshman / Sophomores take) at most legitimate academic institutions.

I still smell BS...


Originally Posted by Anonymous

Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Great post. My oldest played at a D2 school, Received some athletic money but three times as much academic money. Won the D2 championship his sophomore season, got his ring and stopped playing. He was on the verge of losing his academic money because his grades were suffering. Playing a varsity sport in college s a full time job and many of these kids don't realize the time they will have to commit once they are there. After stopping playing my son concentrated on his studies and graduated with a 3.8GPA and a degree in his major in 4 years. he probably would have needed more years and not had as high a GPA if he had continued to play.


I'm calling BS on your post... I guess math is not your strong suit. If your son was almost losing his academic money his GPA was sub 3.0 (more likely in the 2.4 range to lose academic money) after freshman or sophomore year, and graduated in 4 years (lets assume 30 credit hours per year) there is no way he could achieve a 3.8 GPA, even if he got a 4.0 for 3 years in a row (and you said he quite after his sophomore year in danger of losing his academic money.) I guess he told you he had a 3.8 GPA and you believed it.


Not sure that is true - my older son (not participating in any NCAA athletics, but don;t this that is relevant to this discussion) has aid contingent based upon his maintaining a 3.2 GPA - so, I am sure there are varying requirements for different types of aid as well as differences between instituion.


The math still does not work..... Even if the student got a 3.5 thru his sophomore year (he would not be in danger of losing his $$ at that GPA level, so not sure what his actual GPA would be if he was on the bubble at his university) and then got a 4.0 his last 4 semesters the best he could reasonably achieve is a 3.75 GPA. This does not even factor in that upper level classes generally get much tougher than gen ed requirement intro / survey classes (that most Freshman / Sophomores take) at most legitimate academic institutions.

I still smell BS...




So what? Most of what is written on here is BS. Don't over-analyze, just read it for the entertainment value like the rest of us.
Originally Posted by Anonymous

Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My son has very high scholarship but does not enjoy playing lacrosse as much as he used to. He says all the players are changing their majors to easier ones because it's too hard. The coaches make them practice more than they're supposed to and are very hard on them. He would love to quit but can't due to financial reasons. Boys at Ivies are getting no financial help. My question is if a kid not getting much money, why would he stay on the team? It's a full time job with no pay. Once you get in, you're in, so it makes sense to focus on academics, not dead end lacrosse.


Great post. My oldest played at a D2 school, Received some athletic money but three times as much academic money. Won the D2 championship his sophomore season, got his ring and stopped playing. He was on the verge of losing his academic money because his grades were suffering. Playing a varsity sport in college s a full time job and many of these kids don't realize the time they will have to commit once they are there. After stopping playing my son concentrated on his studies and graduated with a 3.8GPA and a degree in his major in 4 years. he probably would have needed more years and not had as high a GPA if he had continued to play.


I'm calling BS on your post... I guess math is not your strong suit. If your son was almost losing his academic money his GPA was sub 3.0 (more likely in the 2.4 range to lose academic money) after freshman or sophomore year, and graduated in 4 years (lets assume 30 credit hours per year) there is no way he could achieve a 3.8 GPA, even if he got a 4.0 for 3 years in a row (and you said he quite after his sophomore year in danger of losing his academic money.) I guess he told you he had a 3.8 GPA and you believed it.


Not sure that is true - my older son (not participating in any NCAA athletics, but don;t this that is relevant to this discussion) has aid contingent based upon his maintaining a 3.2 GPA - so, I am sure there are varying requirements for different types of aid as well as differences between instituion.


The math still does not work..... Even if the student got a 3.5 thru his sophomore year (he would not be in danger of losing his $$ at that GPA level, so not sure what his actual GPA would be if he was on the bubble at his university) and then got a 4.0 his last 4 semesters the best he could reasonably achieve is a 3.75 GPA. This does not even factor in that upper level classes generally get much tougher than gen ed requirement intro / survey classes (that most Freshman / Sophomores take) at most legitimate academic institutions.

I still smell BS...


Different schools have different requirements. Some have none, once they give the money, they won't take it away. It all depends on the program. Some you must maintain a 3.0, others a 2.8.
I agree....math doesn't work. BS. Not even entertaining BS.
it's 2016 and BS is now the acceptable form of communication - if "lacrosse quieter daddy" wants to tell tales of the rising GPA you don't get all Encyclopedia Brown on him, [lacrosse] you should probably be voting for him.
Ultimately, you want max money, make your kid be a dominant FOGO or goalie. My kids team that's where the biggest schollie's went, followed by the big time goal scorers. Definitely don't let your kid be a pole.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Ultimately, you want max money, make your kid be a dominant FOGO or goalie. My kids team that's where the biggest schollie's went, followed by the big time goal scorers. Definitely don't let your kid be a pole.

Max money for lacrosse??? The best you can bet on is a 1/4 schalrship. Please - no one is getting a significant athletic scholarship anywhere for mens lacrosse!
LSM gets some $. Close D nope.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Ultimately, you want max money, make your kid be a dominant FOGO or goalie. My kids team that's where the biggest schollie's went, followed by the big time goal scorers. Definitely don't let your kid be a pole.

Max money for lacrosse??? The best you can bet on is a 1/4 schalrship. Please - no one is getting a significant athletic scholarship anywhere for mens lacrosse!


You have no idea what your talking about. The top kids on my sons college team are receiving 50-75% of cost. My son receives 30,000 in Athletic money.
How much money for warming the bench for the 10 starters?
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Ultimately, you want max money, make your kid be a dominant FOGO or goalie. My kids team that's where the biggest schollie's went, followed by the big time goal scorers. Definitely don't let your kid be a pole.

Max money for lacrosse??? The best you can bet on is a 1/4 schalrship. Please - no one is getting a significant athletic scholarship anywhere for mens lacrosse!


You have no idea what your talking about. The top kids on my sons college team are receiving 50-75% of cost. My son receives 30,000 in Athletic money.


40 man rosters or more makes sense that most of the top kids get 75%..... NOT!
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Ultimately, you want max money, make your kid be a dominant FOGO or goalie. My kids team that's where the biggest schollie's went, followed by the big time goal scorers. Definitely don't let your kid be a pole.

Max money for lacrosse??? The best you can bet on is a 1/4 schalrship. Please - no one is getting a significant athletic scholarship anywhere for mens lacrosse!


You have no idea what your talking about. The top kids on my sons college team are receiving 50-75% of cost. My son receives 30,000 in Athletic money.


NCAA restricts lacrosse scholarships to 12.6 per year per team - do the math. No school is committing much more than 1/4 (maybe a 1/2!) on any one player for the most part, and IF there is rare player who gets more, they are likely one of the best FEW in the country. People who talk about knowing players getting more are mixing athletic with academic and both are handled separately and carry with them differing requirements. In most cases, the academic/need based money is not contingent on lacrosse, and in some cases cannot be.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Ultimately, you want max money, make your kid be a dominant FOGO or goalie. My kids team that's where the biggest schollie's went, followed by the big time goal scorers. Definitely don't let your kid be a pole.

Max money for lacrosse??? The best you can bet on is a 1/4 schalrship. Please - no one is getting a significant athletic scholarship anywhere for mens lacrosse!


You have no idea what your talking about. The top kids on my sons college team are receiving 50-75% of cost. My son receives 30,000 in Athletic money.


40 man rosters or more makes sense that most of the top kids get 75%..... NOT!


http://usatodayhss.com/2015/whats-a-college-lacrosse-scholarship-really-worth

FTA: "“Our next two incoming classes are broken up with most of the kids receiving between 20 and 40 percent, and some kids are just getting books.”

It’s not like there are no free rides, they’re just extremely rare."
here is my quick math rounded out for simplicity on a couple of situations I am familiar with
12 scholarships on team
3 scholarships per class
4 kids get half scholarships
4 kids getting quarter scholarships
4 kids getting nothing
a lot are also getting academic and in many cases more than the athletic

since you can not combine athletic and need based a bunch of kids can get more $ need based than the Athletic that is offered - you make the best package you can either need + academic or athletic + academic
From USA TODAY
"53% of D1 get athletic money"
"Only 2.9% of HS lax players play D1 college"
"Most of the kids who d get offers get 20-40%"
"Many get just 4% to cover their books"
"Here is the lesson to all parents, all that money on private lessons, fitness training and summer travel isn't coming back"

Originally Posted by Anonymous
From USA TODAY
"53% of D1 get athletic money"
"Only 2.9% of HS lax players play D1 college"
"Most of the kids who d get offers get 20-40%"
"Many get just 4% to cover their books"
"Here is the lesson to all parents, all that money on private lessons, fitness training and summer travel isn't coming back"


The lesson money doesn't come back, but I get to watch my son play on the field because he's gotten better than the rest of the kids at his position. That's all I want.
The math gets worse for many parents because top programs often give 80% or more to one top kid in every class.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
From USA TODAY
"53% of D1 get athletic money"
"Only 2.9% of HS lax players play D1 college"
"Most of the kids who d get offers get 20-40%"
"Many get just 4% to cover their books"
"Here is the lesson to all parents, all that money on private lessons, fitness training and summer travel isn't coming back"


Facts are very hard to swallow. Everyone believes that there will be a payout in college. Enjoy the ride it goes very quickly. If your kid wants to play in college there will always be a spot for them
Originally Posted by Anonymous
LSM gets some $. Close D nope.
2020 close guys getting money
I don't know about others but the camps, club lax, lessons, weight speed training, that I spend (and I spend a lot) is for my children to become the best they can at something they love. I really enjoy watching them play. The fact that they are pretty good makes it even better. They enjoy playing. They like working and getting better. For me it is not to "get" money in college. For anyone that thinks that way and while knowing there are only 12 something scholarships for D1 is an idiot or a dreamer.

I spend more money (and time) on gymnastics than lacrosse and there is no way they are getting a dime in that. If they are really lucky maybe they can play DIII.

I would rather spend my money on something they love doing. They are only young once. I only get to watch them once go through it. If I am willing to make the sacrifice in paying and they are willing to put the time in to get better, I will pay all day.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
I don't know about others but the camps, club lax, lessons, weight speed training, that I spend (and I spend a lot) is for my children to become the best they can at something they love. I really enjoy watching them play. The fact that they are pretty good makes it even better. They enjoy playing. They like working and getting better. For me it is not to "get" money in college. For anyone that thinks that way and while knowing there are only 12 something scholarships for D1 is an idiot or a dreamer.

I spend more money (and time) on gymnastics than lacrosse and there is no way they are getting a dime in that. If they are really lucky maybe they can play DIII.

I would rather spend my money on something they love doing. They are only young once. I only get to watch them once go through it. If I am willing to make the sacrifice in paying and they are willing to put the time in to get better, I will pay all day.

Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
I don't know about others but the camps, club lax, lessons, weight speed training, that I spend (and I spend a lot) is for my children to become the best they can at something they love. I really enjoy watching them play. The fact that they are pretty good makes it even better. They enjoy playing. They like working and getting better. For me it is not to "get" money in college. For anyone that thinks that way and while knowing there are only 12 something scholarships for D1 is an idiot or a dreamer.

I spend more money (and time) on gymnastics than lacrosse and there is no way they are getting a dime in that. If they are really lucky maybe they can play DIII.

I would rather spend my money on something they love doing. They are only young once. I only get to watch them once go through it. If I am willing to make the sacrifice in paying and they are willing to put the time in to get better, I will pay all day.




Well said and completely agree
Very true and well said. I truly believe scholarship money means that parents can brag to their friends. The money factor is usually insignificant.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Very true and well said. I truly believe scholarship money means that parents can brag to their friends. The money factor is usually insignificant.


Very good point. I love bragging to my happy hour buddies about the money we'll be getting for text books and all the cool free gear my daughter will be getting. Then I go on and brag about how we are getting all the mileage out of our current cars since we are getting ready to pay out our noses for her education. And I love saying it with a smile. The parents with the younger kids who don't know the facts look at me like I'm full of it.
My guy received over $100,000 for 4 years, that covers the books then some.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
My guy received over $100,000 for 4 years, that covers the books then some.


To an Ivy League school, right?
50 man roster and 12.5 scholarships - do the math. Anyone that tells you they are getting a full ride is lying.
Like was said earlier, the scholarship can be for 1000 bucks. It just now allows the kids dad to say to his friends , my son has a lax scholarship. It gives him something to boost about. That's all it is. That guy can be paying 53 grand a year,but the school is 54 grand. Hey everybody look how cool my son is, he got a division 1 lacrosse scholarship. He won't say it's for 1000 bucks. He won't say he spent 80,000 dollars for 12 years of lacrosse, club fees,clinics,lessons,hotels,equipment,etc,etc,etc. It's comical.
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Like was said earlier, the scholarship can be for 1000 bucks. It just now allows the kids dad to say to his friends , my son has a lax scholarship. It gives him something to boost about. That's all it is. That guy can be paying 53 grand a year,but the school is 54 grand. Hey everybody look how cool my son is, he got a division 1 lacrosse scholarship. He won't say it's for 1000 bucks. He won't say he spent 80,000 dollars for 12 years of lacrosse, club fees,clinics,lessons,hotels,equipment,etc,etc,etc. It's comical.


My sons scholarship is 30,000 Athletic money a year at a 50,000 a year school. Can I brag?
Please share what private university is only 50K a year. Either kid is living at home and commuting or you are lying
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Please share what private university is only 50K a year. Either kid is living at home and commuting or you are lying


It's a top public university. Don't have to believe me, but my son has earned every penny. Don't know why any kid would want to play college sports without getting significant money. After all, it's a full time job.
If that was the case there would be 8 players per roster because 42 out of 50 don't get much money at all. Fact. They play because they enjoy it and it's most likely the last chance to play an organized sport. That's why.
My kid school 57,000 a year, cost for us
Year one 42,000
Year 2 and 3 27,000
Year 4 22,000

Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Please share what private university is only 50K a year. Either kid is living at home and commuting or you are lying


It's a top public university. Don't have to believe me, but my son has earned every penny. Don't know why any kid would want to play college sports without getting significant money. After all, it's a full time job.


Public universities can be a great option. Some offer merit money that can be earned in addition to athletic money. My daughter wants to attend a bigger school with a college town atmosphere. She had offers ranging from 35%-60% athletic money, with the possibility of up to $15k merit money based on her GPA and test scores. Just like at private schools, some players get little to no athletic money. It can be a good deal for a school's top recruits, though - even better if also an excellent student. There are a decent number of public universities with very good lacrosse and academics.
My kid received academic money in top 20 private that is playing in NCAA playoffs (he is not he is playing club lax lol) and its not IVY so it is all academic we are full pay based on income

65,000 per year/tuition/room/board
Year 1- our cost 19,000
Year 2-our cost 19,000
Year 3-our cost 19,000
Year 3 our cost 19,000

46,000 per year academic scholarship

We are paying 4000 the rest is room and board.
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