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Girls 2024 Grads - Mid Atlantic Region
by Anonymous - 11/23/20 06:30 PM
Long Island Yellow Jackets Lacrosse
by Anonymous - 11/23/20 06:15 PM
Boys High School
by Anonymous - 11/23/20 06:05 PM
Boys 2026 Grads - Mid Atlantic Region
by Anonymous - 11/23/20 06:00 PM
Boys High School Lax
by Anonymous - 11/23/20 05:57 PM
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Re: Boys High School Lax
B_O_T_C #301856 05/07/20 08:07 AM
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My Kid is on both lists. But none of this matters unless you play. Many kids not on the list could have turned out to be the better players. A shame we'll never know! Lucky For my son and many of the others, they're headed to play in college next year, so have to be grateful for that!

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Re: Boys High School Lax
B_O_T_C #301861 05/07/20 09:11 AM
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If some of the kids voted for the list,mine did not, then isnt that a good thing. It shows that they can recognize the future leaders for lacrosse.

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Re: Boys High School Lax
B_O_T_C #301872 05/07/20 01:48 PM
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This season being cancelled really messes with the seniors as well as any junior's that haven’t chosen schools

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Re: Boys High School Lax
Anonymous #301884 05/08/20 07:24 AM
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many seniors going on to play in college next year are in touch with their future teammates and looking forward to next year. not a saving grace but it gives them something to look forward to instead of dwelling on the tragedy of this season.

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Re: Boys High School Lax
Anonymous #301982 05/12/20 06:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Anonymous
many seniors going on to play in college next year are in touch with their future teammates and looking forward to next year. not a saving grace but it gives them something to look forward to instead of dwelling on the tragedy of this season.
yes and no. The reality is that this fall, winter, and spring is up in the air, yes, some states and other parts of country are in better shape than others, but, NCAA head Emmert said that schools that don’t have open campus with kids on them, no fall sports. Conference commissioners are on board with this. Ncaa hoops said a decision needs to be made by 9/1 if hoops will even happen. Fauci is going to say that opening too soon will have severe consequences - unneedless suffering and death. Regardless of where you come down on this, states listen to him. Couple this with a recent survey that over 50% of people would NOT take a vaccine even if it were available. Team sports with little or heavy contact will have a tough time coming back. Golf, tennis,etc sure, but revenue generating And contact sports at schools are in real jeopardy of being another year away. Schools getting kids back on campus by 9/1? Tough to see as campuses, dorms, classrooms, food courts lend itself to close proximity at all levels of life on a campus which is part of the college experience. If states,schools, parents follow what Fauci’s of the world say there could be just enough fear to make schools take pause. Will schools be shielded from any liability? Having some sort of a hybrid of on campus/virtual experience is just not the same.. This whole thing stinks.

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Re: Boys High School Lax
Anonymous #301998 05/12/20 01:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
many seniors going on to play in college next year are in touch with their future teammates and looking forward to next year. not a saving grace but it gives them something to look forward to instead of dwelling on the tragedy of this season.
yes and no. The reality is that this fall, winter, and spring is up in the air, yes, some states and other parts of country are in better shape than others, but, NCAA head Emmert said that schools that don’t have open campus with kids on them, no fall sports. Conference commissioners are on board with this. Ncaa hoops said a decision needs to be made by 9/1 if hoops will even happen. Fauci is going to say that opening too soon will have severe consequences - unneedless suffering and death. Regardless of where you come down on this, states listen to him. Couple this with a recent survey that over 50% of people would NOT take a vaccine even if it were available. Team sports with little or heavy contact will have a tough time coming back. Golf, tennis,etc sure, but revenue generating And contact sports at schools are in real jeopardy of being another year away. Schools getting kids back on campus by 9/1? Tough to see as campuses, dorms, classrooms, food courts lend itself to close proximity at all levels of life on a campus which is part of the college experience. If states,schools, parents follow what Fauci’s of the world say there could be just enough fear to make schools take pause. Will schools be shielded from any liability? Having some sort of a hybrid of on campus/virtual experience is just not the same.. This whole thing stinks.


Colleges will be open this Fall. Will it be different? Sure but colleges will begin to go bankrupt quickly if students are not on campus. Housing and meals is almost 50% of their income!

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Re: Boys High School Lax
B_O_T_C #301999 05/12/20 02:36 PM
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Some of these colleges were a house of cards anyway.

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Re: Boys High School Lax
Anonymous #302001 05/12/20 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
How much money do these manhasset parents pay FLG/LILJ to hype their mediocre kids?? A full article about a JV player?


NOW IS MENTIONED WITH THE BEST ON LI.. JORNALISTC INTEGRITY AT ITS FINEST


NOW THE BRO IS ON THE ALL DECADE TEAM..

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Re: Boys High School Lax
Anonymous #302008 05/13/20 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Anonymous

Colleges will be open this Fall. Will it be different? Sure but colleges will begin to go bankrupt quickly if students are not on campus. Housing and meals is almost 50% of their income!


https://www.usnews.com/news/best-st...versity-campuses-staying-closed-for-fall

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Re: Boys High School Lax
B_O_T_C #302030 05/13/20 05:02 PM
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California staying online classes for fall spells no football

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Re: Boys High School Lax
cltlax #302037 05/13/20 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by cltlax
Originally Posted by Anonymous

Colleges will be open this Fall. Will it be different? Sure but colleges will begin to go bankrupt quickly if students are not on campus. Housing and meals is almost 50% of their income!


https://www.usnews.com/news/best-st...versity-campuses-staying-closed-for-fall


Yes but University of Arizona will be open. Cali system is run by state government and can just raise taxes to cover the shortfall. Private universities don’t have that option.

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Re: Boys High School Lax
cltlax #302038 05/13/20 07:47 PM
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Originally Posted by cltlax
Originally Posted by Anonymous

Colleges will be open this Fall. Will it be different? Sure but colleges will begin to go bankrupt quickly if students are not on campus. Housing and meals is almost 50% of their income!


https://www.usnews.com/news/best-st...versity-campuses-staying-closed-for-fall


Message from Purdue President:
Purdue University, for its part, intends to accept students on campus in typical numbers this fall, sober about the certain problems that the COVID-19 virus represents, but determined not to surrender helplessly to those difficulties but to tackle and manage them aggressively and creatively. ...

Distance between people, that is, less density, is now the overriding societal imperative. It could be argued that a college campus will be among the most difficult places to reopen for previously regular activities.

But in other respects, a place like Purdue may be in better position to resume its mission. Our campus community, a “city” of 50,000+ people, is highly unusual in its makeup. At least 80% of our population is made up of young people, say, 35 and under. All data to date tell us that the COVID-19 virus, while it transmits rapidly in this age group, poses close to zero lethal threat to them.

Meanwhile, the virus has proven to be a serious danger to other, older demographic groups, especially those with underlying health problems. The roughly 20% of our Purdue community who are over 35 years old contains a significant number of people with diabetes, asthma, hypertension, and other ailments which together comprise a very high percentage of the fatal and most severe COVID-19 cases.

We will consider new policies and practices that keep these groups separate, or minimize contact between them. Literally, our students pose a far greater danger to others than the virus poses to them. We all have a role, and a responsibility, in ensuring the health of the Purdue community.

The approaches below are preliminary, meant to be illustrative of the objectives we will pursue. View them as examples, likely to be replaced by better ideas as we identify and validate them. They could include spreading out classes across days and times to reduce their size, more use of online instruction for on-campus students, virtualizing laboratory work, and similar steps. ...

We intend to know as much as possible about the viral health status of our community. This could include pre-testing of students and staff before arrival in August, for both infection and post-infection immunity through antibodies. It will include a robust testing system during the school year, using Purdue’s own BSL-2 level laboratory for fast results. Anyone showing symptoms will be tested promptly, and quarantined if positive, in space we will set aside for that purpose.

We expect to be able to trace proximate and/or frequent contacts of those who test positive. Contacts in the vulnerable categories will be asked to self-quarantine for the recommended period, currently 14 days. Those in the young, least vulnerable group will be tested, quarantined if positive, or checked regularly for symptoms if negative for both antibodies and the virus.

Again, these concepts are preliminary, intended mainly to illustrate an overall, data-driven and research-based strategy, and to invite suggestions for their modification or exclusion in favor of better actions. They will be augmented by a host of other changes, such as an indefinite prohibition on gatherings above a specified size, continued limitations on visitors to and travel away from campus, required use of face coverings and other protective equipment, frequent if not daily deep cleaning of facilities, and so forth.

Whatever its eventual components, a return-to-operations strategy is undergirded by a fundamental conviction that even a phenomenon as menacing as COVID-19 is one of the inevitable risks of life. Like most sudden and alarming developments, its dangers are graphic, expressed in tragic individual cases, and immediate; the costs of addressing it are less visible, more diffuse, and longer-term. It is a huge and daunting problem, but the Purdue way has always been to tackle problems, not hide from them.

Closing down our entire society, including our university, was a correct and necessary step. It has had invaluable results. But like any action so drastic, it has come at extraordinary costs, as much human as economic, and at some point, clearly before next fall, those will begin to vastly outweigh the benefits of its continuance. Interrupting and postponing the education of tomorrow’s leaders for another entire semester or year, is one of many such costs. So is permanently damaging the careers and lives of those who have made teaching and research their life’s work, and those who support them in that endeavor.

The COVID-19 virus will remain a fact of life this autumn. Natural immunity, which has been slowed by the shutdown, will not yet have fully developed. No vaccine can be counted on until 2021 at the soonest. It is unclear what course other schools will choose, but Purdue will employ every measure we can adopt or devise to manage this challenge with maximum safety for every member of the Boilermaker family, while proceeding with the noble and essential mission for which our institution stands.

Sincerely,

Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr.

President

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Re: Boys High School Lax
Anonymous #302040 05/14/20 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by cltlax
Originally Posted by Anonymous

Colleges will be open this Fall. Will it be different? Sure but colleges will begin to go bankrupt quickly if students are not on campus. Housing and meals is almost 50% of their income!


https://www.usnews.com/news/best-st...versity-campuses-staying-closed-for-fall


Message from Purdue President:
Purdue University, for its part, intends to accept students on campus in typical numbers this fall, sober about the certain problems that the COVID-19 virus represents, but determined not to surrender helplessly to those difficulties but to tackle and manage them aggressively and creatively. ...

Distance between people, that is, less density, is now the overriding societal imperative. It could be argued that a college campus will be among the most difficult places to reopen for previously regular activities.

But in other respects, a place like Purdue may be in better position to resume its mission. Our campus community, a “city” of 50,000+ people, is highly unusual in its makeup. At least 80% of our population is made up of young people, say, 35 and under. All data to date tell us that the COVID-19 virus, while it transmits rapidly in this age group, poses close to zero lethal threat to them.

Meanwhile, the virus has proven to be a serious danger to other, older demographic groups, especially those with underlying health problems. The roughly 20% of our Purdue community who are over 35 years old contains a significant number of people with diabetes, asthma, hypertension, and other ailments which together comprise a very high percentage of the fatal and most severe COVID-19 cases.

We will consider new policies and practices that keep these groups separate, or minimize contact between them. Literally, our students pose a far greater danger to others than the virus poses to them. We all have a role, and a responsibility, in ensuring the health of the Purdue community.

The approaches below are preliminary, meant to be illustrative of the objectives we will pursue. View them as examples, likely to be replaced by better ideas as we identify and validate them. They could include spreading out classes across days and times to reduce their size, more use of online instruction for on-campus students, virtualizing laboratory work, and similar steps. ...

We intend to know as much as possible about the viral health status of our community. This could include pre-testing of students and staff before arrival in August, for both infection and post-infection immunity through antibodies. It will include a robust testing system during the school year, using Purdue’s own BSL-2 level laboratory for fast results. Anyone showing symptoms will be tested promptly, and quarantined if positive, in space we will set aside for that purpose.

We expect to be able to trace proximate and/or frequent contacts of those who test positive. Contacts in the vulnerable categories will be asked to self-quarantine for the recommended period, currently 14 days. Those in the young, least vulnerable group will be tested, quarantined if positive, or checked regularly for symptoms if negative for both antibodies and the virus.

Again, these concepts are preliminary, intended mainly to illustrate an overall, data-driven and research-based strategy, and to invite suggestions for their modification or exclusion in favor of better actions. They will be augmented by a host of other changes, such as an indefinite prohibition on gatherings above a specified size, continued limitations on visitors to and travel away from campus, required use of face coverings and other protective equipment, frequent if not daily deep cleaning of facilities, and so forth.

Whatever its eventual components, a return-to-operations strategy is undergirded by a fundamental conviction that even a phenomenon as menacing as COVID-19 is one of the inevitable risks of life. Like most sudden and alarming developments, its dangers are graphic, expressed in tragic individual cases, and immediate; the costs of addressing it are less visible, more diffuse, and longer-term. It is a huge and daunting problem, but the Purdue way has always been to tackle problems, not hide from them.

Closing down our entire society, including our university, was a correct and necessary step. It has had invaluable results. But like any action so drastic, it has come at extraordinary costs, as much human as economic, and at some point, clearly before next fall, those will begin to vastly outweigh the benefits of its continuance. Interrupting and postponing the education of tomorrow’s leaders for another entire semester or year, is one of many such costs. So is permanently damaging the careers and lives of those who have made teaching and research their life’s work, and those who support them in that endeavor.

The COVID-19 virus will remain a fact of life this autumn. Natural immunity, which has been slowed by the shutdown, will not yet have fully developed. No vaccine can be counted on until 2021 at the soonest. It is unclear what course other schools will choose, but Purdue will employ every measure we can adopt or devise to manage this challenge with maximum safety for every member of the Boilermaker family, while proceeding with the noble and essential mission for which our institution stands.

Sincerely,

Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr.

President

Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by cltlax
Originally Posted by Anonymous

Colleges will be open this Fall. Will it be different? Sure but colleges will begin to go bankrupt quickly if students are not on campus. Housing and meals is almost 50% of their income!


https://www.usnews.com/news/best-st...versity-campuses-staying-closed-for-fall


Message from Purdue President:
Purdue University, for its part, intends to accept students on campus in typical numbers this fall, sober about the certain problems that the COVID-19 virus represents, but determined not to surrender helplessly to those difficulties but to tackle and manage them aggressively and creatively. ...

Distance between people, that is, less density, is now the overriding societal imperative. It could be argued that a college campus will be among the most difficult places to reopen for previously regular activities.

But in other respects, a place like Purdue may be in better position to resume its mission. Our campus community, a “city” of 50,000+ people, is highly unusual in its makeup. At least 80% of our population is made up of young people, say, 35 and under. All data to date tell us that the COVID-19 virus, while it transmits rapidly in this age group, poses close to zero lethal threat to them.

Meanwhile, the virus has proven to be a serious danger to other, older demographic groups, especially those with underlying health problems. The roughly 20% of our Purdue community who are over 35 years old contains a significant number of people with diabetes, asthma, hypertension, and other ailments which together comprise a very high percentage of the fatal and most severe COVID-19 cases.

We will consider new policies and practices that keep these groups separate, or minimize contact between them. Literally, our students pose a far greater danger to others than the virus poses to them. We all have a role, and a responsibility, in ensuring the health of the Purdue community.

The approaches below are preliminary, meant to be illustrative of the objectives we will pursue. View them as examples, likely to be replaced by better ideas as we identify and validate them. They could include spreading out classes across days and times to reduce their size, more use of online instruction for on-campus students, virtualizing laboratory work, and similar steps. ...

We intend to know as much as possible about the viral health status of our community. This could include pre-testing of students and staff before arrival in August, for both infection and post-infection immunity through antibodies. It will include a robust testing system during the school year, using Purdue’s own BSL-2 level laboratory for fast results. Anyone showing symptoms will be tested promptly, and quarantined if positive, in space we will set aside for that purpose.

We expect to be able to trace proximate and/or frequent contacts of those who test positive. Contacts in the vulnerable categories will be asked to self-quarantine for the recommended period, currently 14 days. Those in the young, least vulnerable group will be tested, quarantined if positive, or checked regularly for symptoms if negative for both antibodies and the virus.

Again, these concepts are preliminary, intended mainly to illustrate an overall, data-driven and research-based strategy, and to invite suggestions for their modification or exclusion in favor of better actions. They will be augmented by a host of other changes, such as an indefinite prohibition on gatherings above a specified size, continued limitations on visitors to and travel away from campus, required use of face coverings and other protective equipment, frequent if not daily deep cleaning of facilities, and so forth.

Whatever its eventual components, a return-to-operations strategy is undergirded by a fundamental conviction that even a phenomenon as menacing as COVID-19 is one of the inevitable risks of life. Like most sudden and alarming developments, its dangers are graphic, expressed in tragic individual cases, and immediate; the costs of addressing it are less visible, more diffuse, and longer-term. It is a huge and daunting problem, but the Purdue way has always been to tackle problems, not hide from them.

Closing down our entire society, including our university, was a correct and necessary step. It has had invaluable results. But like any action so drastic, it has come at extraordinary costs, as much human as economic, and at some point, clearly before next fall, those will begin to vastly outweigh the benefits of its continuance. Interrupting and postponing the education of tomorrow’s leaders for another entire semester or year, is one of many such costs. So is permanently damaging the careers and lives of those who have made teaching and research their life’s work, and those who support them in that endeavor.

The COVID-19 virus will remain a fact of life this autumn. Natural immunity, which has been slowed by the shutdown, will not yet have fully developed. No vaccine can be counted on until 2021 at the soonest. It is unclear what course other schools will choose, but Purdue will employ every measure we can adopt or devise to manage this challenge with maximum safety for every member of the Boilermaker family, while proceeding with the noble and essential mission for which our institution stands.

Sincerely,

Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr.

President


Someone should send this letter to our Governor for consideration in opening the SUNY schools north of Westchester.

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Re: Boys High School Lax
B_O_T_C #302053 05/14/20 01:51 PM
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Mitch Daniels has done a great job at Purdue.

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Re: Boys High School Lax
Anonymous #302059 05/14/20 02:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Mitch Daniels has done a great job at Purdue.


Then why doesn't he have Lax :-)

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