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Re: Early Recruiting
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Come on early recruiting stopping, laughable. How many 2020's have been talked about forget 2019's & 2018's. Please!

But reality tells you, you have a better overall view if you wait till rising Jr. Summer. but like all businesses you need to do your homework and know who those kids will be.

Personally I think early recruiting is a joke but I also think limiting recruitment at any age is a bigger joke. Okay you recruited a 7th grader if it work out great if not your an embarrassment. Get rid of the limits and see after a few years how it goes back to recruiting the best players without a frenzy of potentially marginal players. I think it would be

Freshman year 9th grade 20% would be recruited
Sophomore year 10th grade 35% would be recruited
Junior year 11th grade 40% would be recruited
Senior year 12th grade 5% would be recruited.

Would this be so bad. of course everyone will also try to under cut eachother but high risk high reward.

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I'd be very curious what percentage of these early 2019 recruits are repeats/holdbacks who stood out playing younger competition during 8th grade summer. (It's the grade year when most decide to repeat in the northeast) And then again the majority could be grade/age appropriate, and would lessen the outcry about summer teams stacked with repeaters.

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From what I'm told a good percentage are holdbacks out of the 2019 class. And the rest are just matured early physically. I mean come on West Point has two verbals already. Very surprised at that.

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"freaks of nature" ...take it easy there guy.. this is niche sport. neither of those dudes could make a D3 roster in any of the mainstream sports like football or basketball- sports without all these high priced barriers to entry that lacrosse has. don't get crazy, JJ Watt is a freak of nature.

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Never said freaks of nature there sparky. Just said these kids are matured physically. I have seen a lot of those boys. Many look like they are 16 or 17. It helps when you mature physically at this age.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Never said freaks of nature there sparky. Just said these kids are matured physically. I have seen a lot of those boys. Many look like they are 16 or 17. It helps when you mature physically at this age.


I think he was referring to another comment about Rabil and Pannell

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Never said freaks of nature there sparky. Just said these kids are matured physically. I have seen a lot of those boys. Many look like they are 16 or 17. It helps when you mature physically at this age.


I wouldn't say the LI kids look that much more mature. or I think they have more left to do

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
"freaks of nature" ...take it easy there guy.. this is niche sport. neither of those dudes could make a D3 roster in any of the mainstream sports like football or basketball- sports without all these high priced barriers to entry that lacrosse has. don't get crazy, JJ Watt is a freak of nature.


Sorry there Johnny Bag O Donuts, I was referring to freaks of nature in the context of them being exceptional lacrosse players. Oh and I completely disagree with you, both Rabil and Pannell could easily play D3 Football or basketball. Rabil especially is an exceptional athlete.

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The Long Island kids that have committed are very mature physically. I know them and seen them play many many times.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
"freaks of nature" ...take it easy there guy.. this is niche sport. neither of those dudes could make a D3 roster in any of the mainstream sports like football or basketball- sports without all these high priced barriers to entry that lacrosse has. don't get crazy, JJ Watt is a freak of nature.


Sorry there Johnny Bag O Donuts, I was referring to freaks of nature in the context of them being exceptional lacrosse players. Oh and I completely disagree with you, both Rabil and Pannell could easily play D3 Football or basketball. Rabil especially is an exceptional athlete.
Jim Brown was a freak of nature and a lacrosse first athlete..... OK there guy

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
"freaks of nature" ...take it easy there guy.. this is niche sport. neither of those dudes could make a D3 roster in any of the mainstream sports like football or basketball- sports without all these high priced barriers to entry that lacrosse has. don't get crazy, JJ Watt is a freak of nature.


Hate to break it to you Johnny Football, the better athletes are on the Lacrosse field in D3. My son plays D3 Lacrosse, the football coach would take him and his friends any day. In fact, one kid had a couple of FCS D1 offers to play Football. Others are D1 Lax transfers. You'd be surprised at the level of Athletes... A Friend of mine's son is playing top 5 D3 lax next year, he had Patriot league level football offers. Chose to play Lax, FB coach at the school is begging him to play Football too. Trust me, no one is asking any of the Football players in D3 to play Lax.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
[quote=Anonymous]
Trust me, no one is asking any of the Football players in D3 to play Lax.


I do not know if this is completely true. You are saying there are no D3 football players that played very good lax in HS but choose to play football in college and the college Lax coach has not asked them to play on their team? Hey top level D3 lax is pretty damn good, but I think that is a silly statement. As I know first hand it is not true.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
[quote=Anonymous]
Trust me, no one is asking any of the Football players in D3 to play Lax.


I do not know if this is completely true. You are saying there are no D3 football players that played very good lax in HS but choose to play football in college and the college Lax coach has not asked them to play on their team? Hey top level D3 lax is pretty damn good, but I think that is a silly statement. As I know first hand it is not true.


I am not stating that for the entirety of all D3 programs. Only my son's school. It is the only place I can speak about. However, in general, save for a few football skill players I think I may be more right than wrong for D3. D1 definitely not true. If you could get some of those athletes on the Lacrosse field it would change the game. Think of Elliott on attack, Henry on Midfield, and Bosa with a pole... WOW!!!

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
The Long Island kids that have committed are very mature physically. I know them and seen them play many many times.


They are developed and mature versus other 14, 15 year olds. That isn't a sustainable advantage. Anyone who has experience with high level college sports knows that except for a few lacrosse coaches. I guess we could suppose that a few college lacrosse coaches really know better, but I'll take the other side of that bet every time.

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It is sustainable advantage right now. But let's see 4 yrs from now.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
The Long Island kids that have committed are very mature physically. I know them and seen them play many many times.


They are developed and mature versus other 14, 15 year olds. That isn't a sustainable advantage. Anyone who has experience with high level college sports knows that except for a few lacrosse coaches. I guess we could suppose that a few college lacrosse coaches really know better, but I'll take the other side of that bet every time.


So are you saying the kids that committed in 9th and 10th grade are only doing so because they are more mature? Skill, ability and overall athleticism have nothing to do with it?

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
The Long Island kids that have committed are very mature physically. I know them and seen them play many many times.


They are developed and mature versus other 14, 15 year olds. That isn't a sustainable advantage. Anyone who has experience with high level college sports knows that except for a few lacrosse coaches. I guess we could suppose that a few college lacrosse coaches really know better, but I'll take the other side of that bet every time.


So are you saying the kids that committed in 9th and 10th grade are only doing so because they are more mature? Skill, ability and overall athleticism have nothing to do with it?


Might also have something to do with who they play for? just sayin

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You know I think early recruiting is interesting. Do I wish my son was one of those early recruits? Absolutely if he really knew where he wanted to go and what he wanted to do in 9the grade. For some the decision is a no brainer when committing to schools like Duke, Hopkins, and all the other top 20 schools with D1 programs. You would be stupid not to jump at a chance to go to one of these schools if given the opportunity. My son and I are circumventing the treacherous recruiting road as I write this. We came into the travel lacrosse scene a bit late in 7th grade. So many teams had already been established and it was very tough to crack their top teams. We have played for some great teams only to see them cherry picked by other so called AA teams resulting in the team becoming weaker. If the parents just gave the team more time together rather than look for the AA team moniker the team could have competed with any one. We actually gave some AA teams a run in 1 or 2 goal games. The one thing I have learned and seen first hand that you need an advocate for your kid. I know so many quality players that are not committed and others who happened to play for a great team and an established coach get the early commitment. Many of these players were and still are some of the best players because they were a bit more mature and polished. This is because they were very well coached and played on great teams. While in 7th and 8th grade they really stood out physically and even skill wise. As 9th grade has come around many of the kids that were tall for their age or bigger in 6th-8th are now are average in both areas. Some are still bigger, taller and even better but not the full head and 25-30 pounds they had on others and blowing them away skills wise. I am happy my son and I are where we are in the process. I am seeing kids that at one time were so much better than others who were committed in 9th grade to top programs now being passed by. With puberty and a new found drive and work ethic kids are coming into their own mentally and physically and passing the so called can't miss players. I think that at this time my son is in the best possible position for him. Have a few schools he loves in D1 that also have shown interest back. We also have been introduced to a few schools we never would have considered before but are now very intrigued by. In 9th grade he would have never really known what he wants or if he could do it. It's not the end of the world for the parents or player if they aren't committed by 10th grade. I think certain coaches in D1 and club team directors are creating this frenzy. By the recent results many of these teams who have paved the way by committing 8th and 9th graders might be reconsidering listening to the club directors recommendations on can't miss 9th graders. Which I find hysterical to even type. Don't lose faith and stay the course. Good luck to all.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
The Long Island kids that have committed are very mature physically. I know them and seen them play many many times.


They are developed and mature versus other 14, 15 year olds. That isn't a sustainable advantage. Anyone who has experience with high level college sports knows that except for a few lacrosse coaches. I guess we could suppose that a few college lacrosse coaches really know better, but I'll take the other side of that bet every time.


The comment was the Li kids. I don't think they are overtly any more mature. The early commit are more mature because they are older!

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No I'm talking about mature physically. If your 6'1" 180 lbs at 14 don't tell me your not gonna be better then the 5'4" 125 lb kid that just started puberty. I have seen some of those boys and they are done growing. Kids catch up. But you do have an advantage if you went through puberty already.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
You know I think early recruiting is interesting. Do I wish my son was one of those early recruits? Absolutely if he really knew where he wanted to go and what he wanted to do in 9the grade. For some the decision is a no brainer when committing to schools like Duke, Hopkins, and all the other top 20 schools with D1 programs. You would be stupid not to jump at a chance to go to one of these schools if given the opportunity. My son and I are circumventing the treacherous recruiting road as I write this. We came into the travel lacrosse scene a bit late in 7th grade. So many teams had already been established and it was very tough to crack their top teams. We have played for some great teams only to see them cherry picked by other so called AA teams resulting in the team becoming weaker. If the parents just gave the team more time together rather than look for the AA team moniker the team could have competed with any one. We actually gave some AA teams a run in 1 or 2 goal games. The one thing I have learned and seen first hand that you need an advocate for your kid. I know so many quality players that are not committed and others who happened to play for a great team and an established coach get the early commitment. Many of these players were and still are some of the best players because they were a bit more mature and polished. This is because they were very well coached and played on great teams. While in 7th and 8th grade they really stood out physically and even skill wise. As 9th grade has come around many of the kids that were tall for their age or bigger in 6th-8th are now are average in both areas. Some are still bigger, taller and even better but not the full head and 25-30 pounds they had on others and blowing them away skills wise. I am happy my son and I are where we are in the process. I am seeing kids that at one time were so much better than others who were committed in 9th grade to top programs now being passed by. With puberty and a new found drive and work ethic kids are coming into their own mentally and physically and passing the so called can't miss players. I think that at this time my son is in the best possible position for him. Have a few schools he loves in D1 that also have shown interest back. We also have been introduced to a few schools we never would have considered before but are now very intrigued by. In 9th grade he would have never really known what he wants or if he could do it. It's not the end of the world for the parents or player if they aren't committed by 10th grade. I think certain coaches in D1 and club team directors are creating this frenzy. By the recent results many of these teams who have paved the way by committing 8th and 9th graders might be reconsidering listening to the club directors recommendations on can't miss 9th graders. Which I find hysterical to even type. Don't lose faith and stay the course. Good luck to all.


I agree with much of what you say but there are some things that I would like to point out.

Where are all of these late bloomers? If there are so many late bloomers out there then why do high school coaches bring up so many 9th graders? There is talk on another thread about Garden City, Massapeaqua, Syosset etc.. "the prestigious" programs bringing up a bunch of 9th graders. If there are so many late bloomers why the need to bring up the 9th graders. If college coaches can't tell who is going to develop down the road what make you think the HS coaches can? Is it possible that once the HS coach tags the kid as a can't miss (brings him up in 9th grade) the coach will continue to play the kid even if he doesn't pan out? Will the coach be able to admit he was wrong about the kid or will he just keep playing him?

From what I have seen first hand over the past few years Club Directors have very little influence on the college coaches. However, the club you play for has bas become more important. In recent years the top clubs have joined forces and they send their top teams to exclusive tournaments. Head coaches from the majority of Division 1 programs are all over these tournaments all summer and fall paying particular attention to the rising 9th and 10th graders. College coaches will watch a player multiple times before making an offer (they do not make the offer because the club director tells them to).


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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
You know I think early recruiting is interesting. Do I wish my son was one of those early recruits? Absolutely if he really knew where he wanted to go and what he wanted to do in 9the grade. For some the decision is a no brainer when committing to schools like Duke, Hopkins, and all the other top 20 schools with D1 programs. You would be stupid not to jump at a chance to go to one of these schools if given the opportunity. My son and I are circumventing the treacherous recruiting road as I write this. We came into the travel lacrosse scene a bit late in 7th grade. So many teams had already been established and it was very tough to crack their top teams. We have played for some great teams only to see them cherry picked by other so called AA teams resulting in the team becoming weaker. If the parents just gave the team more time together rather than look for the AA team moniker the team could have competed with any one. We actually gave some AA teams a run in 1 or 2 goal games. The one thing I have learned and seen first hand that you need an advocate for your kid. I know so many quality players that are not committed and others who happened to play for a great team and an established coach get the early commitment. Many of these players were and still are some of the best players because they were a bit more mature and polished. This is because they were very well coached and played on great teams. While in 7th and 8th grade they really stood out physically and even skill wise. As 9th grade has come around many of the kids that were tall for their age or bigger in 6th-8th are now are average in both areas. Some are still bigger, taller and even better but not the full head and 25-30 pounds they had on others and blowing them away skills wise. I am happy my son and I are where we are in the process. I am seeing kids that at one time were so much better than others who were committed in 9th grade to top programs now being passed by. With puberty and a new found drive and work ethic kids are coming into their own mentally and physically and passing the so called can't miss players. I think that at this time my son is in the best possible position for him. Have a few schools he loves in D1 that also have shown interest back. We also have been introduced to a few schools we never would have considered before but are now very intrigued by. In 9th grade he would have never really known what he wants or if he could do it. It's not the end of the world for the parents or player if they aren't committed by 10th grade. I think certain coaches in D1 and club team directors are creating this frenzy. By the recent results many of these teams who have paved the way by committing 8th and 9th graders might be reconsidering listening to the club directors recommendations on can't miss 9th graders. Which I find hysterical to even type. Don't lose faith and stay the course. Good luck to all.


I agree with much of what you say but there are some things that I would like to point out.

Where are all of these late bloomers? If there are so many late bloomers out there then why do high school coaches bring up so many 9th graders? There is talk on another thread about Garden City, Massapeaqua, Syosset etc.. "the prestigious" programs bringing up a bunch of 9th graders. If there are so many late bloomers why the need to bring up the 9th graders. If college coaches can't tell who is going to develop down the road what make you think the HS coaches can? Is it possible that once the HS coach tags the kid as a can't miss (brings him up in 9th grade) the coach will continue to play the kid even if he doesn't pan out? Will the coach be able to admit he was wrong about the kid or will he just keep playing him?

From what I have seen first hand over the past few years Club Directors have very little influence on the college coaches. However, the club you play for has bas become more important. In recent years the top clubs have joined forces and they send their top teams to exclusive tournaments. Head coaches from the majority of Division 1 programs are all over these tournaments all summer and fall paying particular attention to the rising 9th and 10th graders. College coaches will watch a player multiple times before making an offer (they do not make the offer because the club director tells them to).



How many studs can one town have so that's why some towns bring up freshman. Usually the freshmen brought up are the early to mature/the old for their grade kids. Yes they are skilled and not a knock against them but to be competitive some towns need to bring up freshman. The bringing up of freshman has a lot to do with all these club guys being involved in high school teams. What happened to earning your stripes. Play JV and at least one year then play varsity. It's rush them up, it's mom and dad pulling strings, it's club directors influencing who gets brought up. Not to say there are those not deserving. I played varsity in 9th grade. I didn't ask for it, but was brought up. My parents had no clue they were too busy working. Things have changed so much. Why are parents so involved with what a high school coaches does? I think a lot is being forced. Let the kids develop. Haven't you seen the trend of coaches constantly changing. You will rarely see a coach around for a long time like Manhasset and Farmingdale.

In regards to the club directors not having influence, I think your wrong. If a guy like SL from an established club is calling saying he has a can't miss players in 8th and 9th grade these college coaches are listening. These club coaches are using their relationships they have built in the lacrosse community to advocate for their players. You don't think MC is calling every coach he knows to get his players recruited . Try and call college coaches as a parent they really aren't calling you back. Even an established high school coaches has those relationships. Schools like Chaminade, GC, and Manhasset to name a few. I have seen it first hand and been in the room when those calls are made. Yes the college coach and their staff will watch a player play but having your club or high school coach contact them and letting them know your on the map helps tremendously. Playing for the right club and going to the right tournaments or being selectEd to Philly Showcase, Jake Reed or Maverick because your club Coach has 4 automatic bids helps. The best players don't always get these bids. The players on the right clubs do.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
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You know I think early recruiting is interesting. Do I wish my son was one of those early recruits? Absolutely if he really knew where he wanted to go and what he wanted to do in 9the grade. For some the decision is a no brainer when committing to schools like Duke, Hopkins, and all the other top 20 schools with D1 programs. You would be stupid not to jump at a chance to go to one of these schools if given the opportunity. My son and I are circumventing the treacherous recruiting road as I write this. We came into the travel lacrosse scene a bit late in 7th grade. So many teams had already been established and it was very tough to crack their top teams. We have played for some great teams only to see them cherry picked by other so called AA teams resulting in the team becoming weaker. If the parents just gave the team more time together rather than look for the AA team moniker the team could have competed with any one. We actually gave some AA teams a run in 1 or 2 goal games. The one thing I have learned and seen first hand that you need an advocate for your kid. I know so many quality players that are not committed and others who happened to play for a great team and an established coach get the early commitment. Many of these players were and still are some of the best players because they were a bit more mature and polished. This is because they were very well coached and played on great teams. While in 7th and 8th grade they really stood out physically and even skill wise. As 9th grade has come around many of the kids that were tall for their age or bigger in 6th-8th are now are average in both areas. Some are still bigger, taller and even better but not the full head and 25-30 pounds they had on others and blowing them away skills wise. I am happy my son and I are where we are in the process. I am seeing kids that at one time were so much better than others who were committed in 9th grade to top programs now being passed by. With puberty and a new found drive and work ethic kids are coming into their own mentally and physically and passing the so called can't miss players. I think that at this time my son is in the best possible position for him. Have a few schools he loves in D1 that also have shown interest back. We also have been introduced to a few schools we never would have considered before but are now very intrigued by. In 9th grade he would have never really known what he wants or if he could do it. It's not the end of the world for the parents or player if they aren't committed by 10th grade. I think certain coaches in D1 and club team directors are creating this frenzy. By the recent results many of these teams who have paved the way by committing 8th and 9th graders might be reconsidering listening to the club directors recommendations on can't miss 9th graders. Which I find hysterical to even type. Don't lose faith and stay the course. Good luck to all.


I agree with much of what you say but there are some things that I would like to point out.

Where are all of these late bloomers? If there are so many late bloomers out there then why do high school coaches bring up so many 9th graders? There is talk on another thread about Garden City, Massapeaqua, Syosset etc.. "the prestigious" programs bringing up a bunch of 9th graders. If there are so many late bloomers why the need to bring up the 9th graders. If college coaches can't tell who is going to develop down the road what make you think the HS coaches can? Is it possible that once the HS coach tags the kid as a can't miss (brings him up in 9th grade) the coach will continue to play the kid even if he doesn't pan out? Will the coach be able to admit he was wrong about the kid or will he just keep playing him?

From what I have seen first hand over the past few years Club Directors have very little influence on the college coaches. However, the club you play for has bas become more important. In recent years the top clubs have joined forces and they send their top teams to exclusive tournaments. Head coaches from the majority of Division 1 programs are all over these tournaments all summer and fall paying particular attention to the rising 9th and 10th graders. College coaches will watch a player multiple times before making an offer (they do not make the offer because the club director tells them to).

There is much talk about the "late bloomers" and where are they? The "late bloomer" is going to become extinct like the dinoaurs. Why is that? Because there is so much pressure to win at an early age on club teams, all the "early bloomers" are put on the A teams, regardless of their size. And when I say "early bloomer" I'm talking lax skill not physical size. A three foot eight kid who can sling it lefty will make the team all day long over a 4 foot four kid who is still trying to figure out what end of the stick to hold. So the tiny tyke plays with the best players and gets the best coaching. Fast forward to 8th grade and that A travel team is rolling, and some of the tiny tykes have monster stats. The team travels and college coaches start taking note. Now the potential "late bloomers" have been on B and C teams and the truth is, the club, the high school coaches and the college coaches could care less about them. So these players must either be at lesser public or private high schools to play and hopefully finally be coached. Now the top college coaches are falling over themselves to scoop up all the 9th grade (early bloomers) in the hopes that they hit the lottery and that player continues to develop, continues to grow, and continues to get good grades. Very few club coaches say, give me the best athlete and I will make him a great player. They say give me the best third grade lacrosse players and let the high school coach worry down the road. The only hope is that parity continues in the college ranks and the lesser D-1 schools make more informed decisions about more mature kids and start to compete with the early recruiters. But in the meantime, the moral of the story is, the train has left the station and the late bloomers have been left standing on the platform. In this fast paced, accelerated recruiting world, and the rise of the club teams, have your child up and running in second grade or find yourself chasing the early bloomers down the tracks.

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You know I think early recruiting is interesting. Do I wish my son was one of those early recruits? Absolutely if he really knew where he wanted to go and what he wanted to do in 9the grade. For some the decision is a no brainer when committing to schools like Duke, Hopkins, and all the other top 20 schools with D1 programs. You would be stupid not to jump at a chance to go to one of these schools if given the opportunity. My son and I are circumventing the treacherous recruiting road as I write this. We came into the travel lacrosse scene a bit late in 7th grade. So many teams had already been established and it was very tough to crack their top teams. We have played for some great teams only to see them cherry picked by other so called AA teams resulting in the team becoming weaker. If the parents just gave the team more time together rather than look for the AA team moniker the team could have competed with any one. We actually gave some AA teams a run in 1 or 2 goal games. The one thing I have learned and seen first hand that you need an advocate for your kid. I know so many quality players that are not committed and others who happened to play for a great team and an established coach get the early commitment. Many of these players were and still are some of the best players because they were a bit more mature and polished. This is because they were very well coached and played on great teams. While in 7th and 8th grade they really stood out physically and even skill wise. As 9th grade has come around many of the kids that were tall for their age or bigger in 6th-8th are now are average in both areas. Some are still bigger, taller and even better but not the full head and 25-30 pounds they had on others and blowing them away skills wise. I am happy my son and I are where we are in the process. I am seeing kids that at one time were so much better than others who were committed in 9th grade to top programs now being passed by. With puberty and a new found drive and work ethic kids are coming into their own mentally and physically and passing the so called can't miss players. I think that at this time my son is in the best possible position for him. Have a few schools he loves in D1 that also have shown interest back. We also have been introduced to a few schools we never would have considered before but are now very intrigued by. In 9th grade he would have never really known what he wants or if he could do it. It's not the end of the world for the parents or player if they aren't committed by 10th grade. I think certain coaches in D1 and club team directors are creating this frenzy. By the recent results many of these teams who have paved the way by committing 8th and 9th graders might be reconsidering listening to the club directors recommendations on can't miss 9th graders. Which I find hysterical to even type. Don't lose faith and stay the course. Good luck to all.


I agree with much of what you say but there are some things that I would like to point out.

Where are all of these late bloomers? If there are so many late bloomers out there then why do high school coaches bring up so many 9th graders? There is talk on another thread about Garden City, Massapeaqua, Syosset etc.. "the prestigious" programs bringing up a bunch of 9th graders. If there are so many late bloomers why the need to bring up the 9th graders. If college coaches can't tell who is going to develop down the road what make you think the HS coaches can? Is it possible that once the HS coach tags the kid as a can't miss (brings him up in 9th grade) the coach will continue to play the kid even if he doesn't pan out? Will the coach be able to admit he was wrong about the kid or will he just keep playing him?

From what I have seen first hand over the past few years Club Directors have very little influence on the college coaches. However, the club you play for has bas become more important. In recent years the top clubs have joined forces and they send their top teams to exclusive tournaments. Head coaches from the majority of Division 1 programs are all over these tournaments all summer and fall paying particular attention to the rising 9th and 10th graders. College coaches will watch a player multiple times before making an offer (they do not make the offer because the club director tells them to).

There is much talk about the "late bloomers" and where are they? The "late bloomer" is going to become extinct like the dinoaurs. Why is that? Because there is so much pressure to win at an early age on club teams, all the "early bloomers" are put on the A teams, regardless of their size. And when I say "early bloomer" I'm talking lax skill not physical size. A three foot eight kid who can sling it lefty will make the team all day long over a 4 foot four kid who is still trying to figure out what end of the stick to hold. So the tiny tyke plays with the best players and gets the best coaching. Fast forward to 8th grade and that A travel team is rolling, and some of the tiny tykes have monster stats. The team travels and college coaches start taking note. Now the potential "late bloomers" have been on B and C teams and the truth is, the club, the high school coaches and the college coaches could care less about them. So these players must either be at lesser public or private high schools to play and hopefully finally be coached. Now the top college coaches are falling over themselves to scoop up all the 9th grade (early bloomers) in the hopes that they hit the lottery and that player continues to develop, continues to grow, and continues to get good grades. Very few club coaches say, give me the best athlete and I will make him a great player. They say give me the best third grade lacrosse players and let the high school coach worry down the road. The only hope is that parity continues in the college ranks and the lesser D-1 schools make more informed decisions about more mature kids and start to compete with the early recruiters. But in the meantime, the moral of the story is, the train has left the station and the late bloomers have been left standing on the platform. In this fast paced, accelerated recruiting world, and the rise of the club teams, have your child up and running in second grade or find yourself chasing the early bloomers down the tracks.


You write this as if nothing ever changes in life. I could cite you examples as long as my arm of practices in all areas of life that were followed and later reversed. The only way early recruiting continues is if/when those teams that do it become unstoppable. Right now Notre Dame is the #1 team in the country and they actually have a reputatioins for poaching kids later. And you cannot go off 2 weeks of D1 results to proclaim parity or decide what it tells us about the long-term impact of early recruiting. The sample size just isn't big enought yet.

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You know I think early recruiting is interesting. Do I wish my son was one of those early recruits? Absolutely if he really knew where he wanted to go and what he wanted to do in 9the grade. For some the decision is a no brainer when committing to schools like Duke, Hopkins, and all the other top 20 schools with D1 programs. You would be stupid not to jump at a chance to go to one of these schools if given the opportunity. My son and I are circumventing the treacherous recruiting road as I write this. We came into the travel lacrosse scene a bit late in 7th grade. So many teams had already been established and it was very tough to crack their top teams. We have played for some great teams only to see them cherry picked by other so called AA teams resulting in the team becoming weaker. If the parents just gave the team more time together rather than look for the AA team moniker the team could have competed with any one. We actually gave some AA teams a run in 1 or 2 goal games. The one thing I have learned and seen first hand that you need an advocate for your kid. I know so many quality players that are not committed and others who happened to play for a great team and an established coach get the early commitment. Many of these players were and still are some of the best players because they were a bit more mature and polished. This is because they were very well coached and played on great teams. While in 7th and 8th grade they really stood out physically and even skill wise. As 9th grade has come around many of the kids that were tall for their age or bigger in 6th-8th are now are average in both areas. Some are still bigger, taller and even better but not the full head and 25-30 pounds they had on others and blowing them away skills wise. I am happy my son and I are where we are in the process. I am seeing kids that at one time were so much better than others who were committed in 9th grade to top programs now being passed by. With puberty and a new found drive and work ethic kids are coming into their own mentally and physically and passing the so called can't miss players. I think that at this time my son is in the best possible position for him. Have a few schools he loves in D1 that also have shown interest back. We also have been introduced to a few schools we never would have considered before but are now very intrigued by. In 9th grade he would have never really known what he wants or if he could do it. It's not the end of the world for the parents or player if they aren't committed by 10th grade. I think certain coaches in D1 and club team directors are creating this frenzy. By the recent results many of these teams who have paved the way by committing 8th and 9th graders might be reconsidering listening to the club directors recommendations on can't miss 9th graders. Which I find hysterical to even type. Don't lose faith and stay the course. Good luck to all.


I agree with much of what you say but there are some things that I would like to point out.

Where are all of these late bloomers? If there are so many late bloomers out there then why do high school coaches bring up so many 9th graders? There is talk on another thread about Garden City, Massapeaqua, Syosset etc.. "the prestigious" programs bringing up a bunch of 9th graders. If there are so many late bloomers why the need to bring up the 9th graders. If college coaches can't tell who is going to develop down the road what make you think the HS coaches can? Is it possible that once the HS coach tags the kid as a can't miss (brings him up in 9th grade) the coach will continue to play the kid even if he doesn't pan out? Will the coach be able to admit he was wrong about the kid or will he just keep playing him?

From what I have seen first hand over the past few years Club Directors have very little influence on the college coaches. However, the club you play for has bas become more important. In recent years the top clubs have joined forces and they send their top teams to exclusive tournaments. Head coaches from the majority of Division 1 programs are all over these tournaments all summer and fall paying particular attention to the rising 9th and 10th graders. College coaches will watch a player multiple times before making an offer (they do not make the offer because the club director tells them to).

There is much talk about the "late bloomers" and where are they? The "late bloomer" is going to become extinct like the dinoaurs. Why is that? Because there is so much pressure to win at an early age on club teams, all the "early bloomers" are put on the A teams, regardless of their size. And when I say "early bloomer" I'm talking lax skill not physical size. A three foot eight kid who can sling it lefty will make the team all day long over a 4 foot four kid who is still trying to figure out what end of the stick to hold. So the tiny tyke plays with the best players and gets the best coaching. Fast forward to 8th grade and that A travel team is rolling, and some of the tiny tykes have monster stats. The team travels and college coaches start taking note. Now the potential "late bloomers" have been on B and C teams and the truth is, the club, the high school coaches and the college coaches could care less about them. So these players must either be at lesser public or private high schools to play and hopefully finally be coached. Now the top college coaches are falling over themselves to scoop up all the 9th grade (early bloomers) in the hopes that they hit the lottery and that player continues to develop, continues to grow, and continues to get good grades. Very few club coaches say, give me the best athlete and I will make him a great player. They say give me the best third grade lacrosse players and let the high school coach worry down the road. The only hope is that parity continues in the college ranks and the lesser D-1 schools make more informed decisions about more mature kids and start to compete with the early recruiters. But in the meantime, the moral of the story is, the train has left the station and the late bloomers have been left standing on the platform. In this fast paced, accelerated recruiting world, and the rise of the club teams, have your child up and running in second grade or find yourself chasing the early bloomers down the tracks.


You write this as if nothing ever changes in life. I could cite you examples as long as my arm of practices in all areas of life that were followed and later reversed. The only way early recruiting continues is if/when those teams that do it become unstoppable. Right now Notre Dame is the #1 team in the country and they actually have a reputatioins for poaching kids later. And you cannot go off 2 weeks of D1 results to proclaim parity or decide what it tells us about the long-term impact of early recruiting. The sample size just isn't big enought yet.


Not saying above is ideal. Saying it is what is happening. Parents aren't waiting for Notre Dame. They are jumping on Hopkins and Duke and the ripple effect is changing how parents operate regarding 9 year olds. I would much prefer the way it was 25 years ago. You know how many of us that played D-1 lacrosse and were recruited after 11th grade, say we would never play D-1 today? Lots. Do I hope that Notre Dame and Ohio State and others continue to poach players? Absolutely! By the way, my theory on why there are so many 5-9 attackman these days? Because no one is waiting until 11th grade and beyond to see who will actually grow. These little guys are not being discriminated against and are getting really good coaching at early ages, regardless of our their size. Add that to the rule changes and there is no longer a premium on size. The days of saying, oh, that kid is going to get killed out there are over. Not saying that it's bad. Just saying this is how the game has evolved. That diminishes a lot of the potential a "late bloomer" could bring into the equation. So yes, when the sample size expands and we have the benefit of time, we will see how it all shakes out. But I will say, most rational people would say that the recruiting of younger and younger kids is neither good for the game, not for the kids that we care so much about.

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Re: Early Recruiting
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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
You know I think early recruiting is interesting. Do I wish my son was one of those early recruits? Absolutely if he really knew where he wanted to go and what he wanted to do in 9the grade. For some the decision is a no brainer when committing to schools like Duke, Hopkins, and all the other top 20 schools with D1 programs. You would be stupid not to jump at a chance to go to one of these schools if given the opportunity. My son and I are circumventing the treacherous recruiting road as I write this. We came into the travel lacrosse scene a bit late in 7th grade. So many teams had already been established and it was very tough to crack their top teams. We have played for some great teams only to see them cherry picked by other so called AA teams resulting in the team becoming weaker. If the parents just gave the team more time together rather than look for the AA team moniker the team could have competed with any one. We actually gave some AA teams a run in 1 or 2 goal games. The one thing I have learned and seen first hand that you need an advocate for your kid. I know so many quality players that are not committed and others who happened to play for a great team and an established coach get the early commitment. Many of these players were and still are some of the best players because they were a bit more mature and polished. This is because they were very well coached and played on great teams. While in 7th and 8th grade they really stood out physically and even skill wise. As 9th grade has come around many of the kids that were tall for their age or bigger in 6th-8th are now are average in both areas. Some are still bigger, taller and even better but not the full head and 25-30 pounds they had on others and blowing them away skills wise. I am happy my son and I are where we are in the process. I am seeing kids that at one time were so much better than others who were committed in 9th grade to top programs now being passed by. With puberty and a new found drive and work ethic kids are coming into their own mentally and physically and passing the so called can't miss players. I think that at this time my son is in the best possible position for him. Have a few schools he loves in D1 that also have shown interest back. We also have been introduced to a few schools we never would have considered before but are now very intrigued by. In 9th grade he would have never really known what he wants or if he could do it. It's not the end of the world for the parents or player if they aren't committed by 10th grade. I think certain coaches in D1 and club team directors are creating this frenzy. By the recent results many of these teams who have paved the way by committing 8th and 9th graders might be reconsidering listening to the club directors recommendations on can't miss 9th graders. Which I find hysterical to even type. Don't lose faith and stay the course. Good luck to all.


I agree with much of what you say but there are some things that I would like to point out.

Where are all of these late bloomers? If there are so many late bloomers out there then why do high school coaches bring up so many 9th graders? There is talk on another thread about Garden City, Massapeaqua, Syosset etc.. "the prestigious" programs bringing up a bunch of 9th graders. If there are so many late bloomers why the need to bring up the 9th graders. If college coaches can't tell who is going to develop down the road what make you think the HS coaches can? Is it possible that once the HS coach tags the kid as a can't miss (brings him up in 9th grade) the coach will continue to play the kid even if he doesn't pan out? Will the coach be able to admit he was wrong about the kid or will he just keep playing him?

From what I have seen first hand over the past few years Club Directors have very little influence on the college coaches. However, the club you play for has bas become more important. In recent years the top clubs have joined forces and they send their top teams to exclusive tournaments. Head coaches from the majority of Division 1 programs are all over these tournaments all summer and fall paying particular attention to the rising 9th and 10th graders. College coaches will watch a player multiple times before making an offer (they do not make the offer because the club director tells them to).

There is much talk about the "late bloomers" and where are they? The "late bloomer" is going to become extinct like the dinoaurs. Why is that? Because there is so much pressure to win at an early age on club teams, all the "early bloomers" are put on the A teams, regardless of their size. And when I say "early bloomer" I'm talking lax skill not physical size. A three foot eight kid who can sling it lefty will make the team all day long over a 4 foot four kid who is still trying to figure out what end of the stick to hold. So the tiny tyke plays with the best players and gets the best coaching. Fast forward to 8th grade and that A travel team is rolling, and some of the tiny tykes have monster stats. The team travels and college coaches start taking note. Now the potential "late bloomers" have been on B and C teams and the truth is, the club, the high school coaches and the college coaches could care less about them. So these players must either be at lesser public or private high schools to play and hopefully finally be coached. Now the top college coaches are falling over themselves to scoop up all the 9th grade (early bloomers) in the hopes that they hit the lottery and that player continues to develop, continues to grow, and continues to get good grades. Very few club coaches say, give me the best athlete and I will make him a great player. They say give me the best third grade lacrosse players and let the high school coach worry down the road. The only hope is that parity continues in the college ranks and the lesser D-1 schools make more informed decisions about more mature kids and start to compete with the early recruiters. But in the meantime, the moral of the story is, the train has left the station and the late bloomers have been left standing on the platform. In this fast paced, accelerated recruiting world, and the rise of the club teams, have your child up and running in second grade or find yourself chasing the early bloomers down the tracks.


I can only speak for what I have seen. There are players that have committed to some really top notch programs at an early age that in 7th and 8th grade were absolutely the best players on the field. Yes skill wise and even a bit bigger than most in height and stature even some small players also. Now all of the sudden that kid that was on the B because, lets face it a team can really only carry so many players, starts to mature and develop their skills and all of the sudden grows a bit more and on his own puts in the time and effort to get better. They have had great coaching but were a bit immature at a young age. They now are driven and put in the work. They can and will absolutely pass the kid that now stands at 5'8 and fully grown. Now that kid who was overlooked has a chip on their shoulder is 6'1 and has put in countless hours of wall ball and training will pass the early bloomer. Not due to lack of effort but you can only get so much and so far out of a Honda. Quality yes, last a long time yes but know you have a kid thats was a sleeper turning into a Ferrari. I think this is happening now and more evident due to the sheer number of early commits in 9th and 10th grade. Early commits have been around for a long time but it was for the truly exceptional players. This is the same as club ball years ago the club teams were made up of top players even towns that had great history of lacrosse. When lacrosse became about money it has diluted the overall product. Could you imagine if the best players were selected in an unbiased manner from Long Island to make up one team. I dont think there is an area in the country that would even come close to the talent. I could name a combined team from 91, Express, Team Long Island, Jesters, and fl$ that would destroy anyone. The powers that control these teams would never let it happen because it would hurt their bottom line. So you know my own kid wouldn't be on that team.

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I saw a few late bloomers from Limestone scrimmage UNC. They beat UNC's 1s very thoroughly. I saw a few more late bloomers absolutely wipe out UVA's 1s in another scrimmage. Today some top D3 teams can beat ranked D1 teams. The pushing for the best very young youth players hasn't yielded better college players. I am not just pointing to 2 weeks this spring when I note that. There are many 2016 and 2017 early commits in the DMV who won't see the field in college. Some of them aren't seeing the field at their prep schools. I've heard it all that these certain preps have all the best players, so second line middies there are great. Honestly, if you struggle to stand out junior or senior year of high school, early recruiting is a mistake.

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Look, if my 15 year old gets an offer from a great school that is not an Ivy such as UNC, UVA or Mich he will take it and we will figure out whether he wants to keep it when he is 18...

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Look, if my 15 year old gets an offer from a great school that is not an Ivy such as UNC, UVA or Mich he will take it and we will figure out whether he wants to keep it when he is 18...


That's the right approach..they won't offer you a dime yet..wake up ..geezz that's dumb

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Go for the academics--all great schools, so who cares what they offer!

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Richmond 12 Duke 10 Richmond has only been varsity for 3 years. PARITY and the sudden realization that recruiting 8th graders is not an exact science.

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As irony would have it, we've not seen the fuller effects of ER yet. The HS 2017s were the first class to open the floodgates of 9th grade commits. These 2016s seniors had a few 9th grader commits, and then tons of summer rising soph commits. But what I call ER happened earlier. A lot of HS 2013s committed as rising juniors, then a lot of 2014s and 2015s committed as rising sophs. I would argue we're seeing a PARTIAL effect now with kids who are in college now. This college senior class will be the final chapter of college players who were offered and committed after they played the spring high school season as juniors.

People are free to take their own theories now. The data isn't complete yet, but the partial date in so far does make the point the ER is a poor strategy. Going early to get THE star in the class like Shack Stanwick or Ryan Conrad or Matt Rambo does get your team ONE great player on a given year. Considering Hop, UVA, UMD are all sucking now (and UNC has losses) to start this season before the real conference season starts for them is a REALLY bad sign. The problem now is if you harvest 9th graders and get one star, you're not set you're screwed because you have to field 10.

Also, at some positions like FOGO and goalie which are really important the ER there seems to be the worst. A good number of the top FOGOs and goalies in the college game today were not the Ty Xanders boy band kids from back in the day...you know, back in 9th grade brah!

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I wish my team sucked as bad as Hop,Uva and Umd. They will still beat 95% of the other schools. Lets see who's there in the end.

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60% of the time your point is correct 95% of the time.

UVA loses to High Point, Hop loses 3 early and needs a miracle to skate by Navy and Duke loses to Richmond. UNC gets doubled up by Hofstra. I'm not a hater of all those teams and I went to UVA and have been a Hoo fan my whole life. The real insiders and followers of UVA lacrosse have been noting the obvious for a couple years now.

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Ty Xander's boy band lmfao. Still the facts that the likes of hop duke umd virginia still get the top rated kids according to that idiot and it is not working out. Let him go to the secondary type of recruiting showcases and see if he finds diamonds in the rough then I will give him some kudos. Those teams shouldn't lose games like this if they have these supposed top kids. Sorry those are facts.

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The kids are getting a great education right. That should be the important thing.

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It not early recruiting that is the problem-it is bad recruiting.
If they make early recruiting illegal it will be a advantage for the power schools. why would parents want early recruiting eliminated?
It would give the advantage to the schools even more than it is now.
The whole system is rigged in favor of the coach.
The big schools will put out feelers for top players under the table it happens all the time in other sports.

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New to this so please pardon my I gnorance but could could someone school me on verbal commitments? I realize they are just that and there's no binding contract but what if a young athlete changes their mind in a year or two? Are they blacklisted? Do schools ever rescind offers and are there stipulations such as GPA, SAT scores?
Last question, are there any good sites or resources that can help someone navigate this process that you can point me to?

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
New to this so please pardon my I gnorance but could could someone school me on verbal commitments? I realize they are just that and there's no binding contract but what if a young athlete changes their mind in a year or two? Are they blacklisted? Do schools ever rescind offers and are there stipulations such as GPA, SAT scores?
Last question, are there any good sites or resources that can help someone navigate this process that you can point me to?


Kids can change their minds at any time until the sign a national letter of intent (NLI) in there senior year and you only sign an NLI if you are receiving athletic aid so no NLI for Ivy League, Military Academy's or D3. I kid that de-commits from a verbal usually does so with a new offer of a verbal commit from another school. Generally the verbal is between the coach and the player so some schools de commit if the coaches leave the school but that would probably be the younger players so the new coach can bring in his own recruits but every case is unique. A coach will generally tell the younger players that they must get X GPA and X SAT to be accepted and the verbal is contingent on but not guaranteed with admission. Coaches will generally not break a verbal commitment because they have a reputation to worry about and if they people start saying the have not honored commitments they would have a hard time getting them in the future. I have heard of coaches telling a kid that they have committed to another kid at the same position and tell the kid they will still honor the verbal but the kid might want to look for a different situation.

This is all my opinion from going through it a few times but every school and every case is different.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
New to this so please pardon my I gnorance but could could someone school me on verbal commitments? I realize they are just that and there's no binding contract but what if a young athlete changes their mind in a year or two? Are they blacklisted? Do schools ever rescind offers and are there stipulations such as GPA, SAT scores?
Last question, are there any good sites or resources that can help someone navigate this process that you can point me to?


Kids can change their minds at any time until the sign a national letter of intent (NLI) in there senior year and you only sign an NLI if you are receiving athletic aid so no NLI for Ivy League, Military Academy's or D3. I kid that de-commits from a verbal usually does so with a new offer of a verbal commit from another school. Generally the verbal is between the coach and the player so some schools de commit if the coaches leave the school but that would probably be the younger players so the new coach can bring in his own recruits but every case is unique. A coach will generally tell the younger players that they must get X GPA and X SAT to be accepted and the verbal is contingent on but not guaranteed with admission. Coaches will generally not break a verbal commitment because they have a reputation to worry about and if they people start saying the have not honored commitments they would have a hard time getting them in the future. I have heard of coaches telling a kid that they have committed to another kid at the same position and tell the kid they will still honor the verbal but the kid might want to look for a different situation.

This is all my opinion from going through it a few times but every school and every case is different.


So at what point in the process does athletic aid get discussed? Do these verbals ever come with xxx dollars as part of the offer or is every case different?

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