NOBODY DOES IT BETTER
Most Recent Posts
Boys 2024 - 6th Grade Fall 2017/Summer 2018
by Anonymous. 11/23/17 01:41 PM
Top NJ Girl's Club Teams
by Anonymous. 11/23/17 01:09 PM
Duke's Lacrosse
by Anonymous. 11/23/17 12:43 PM
Boys 2022 - 8th Grade Fall 2017/Summer 2018
by Anonymous. 11/23/17 12:14 PM
Boys 2024 - 6th Grade Fall 2017/Summer 2018
by Anonymous. 11/23/17 11:53 AM
Girls 2020 - 10th Grade Fall 2017/Summer 2018
by Anonymous. 11/23/17 11:46 AM
Forum Statistics
Forums13
Topics1,212
Posts214,699
Members1,865
Most Online3,796
Oct 23rd, 2017
SUBSCRIBE


Previous Thread
Next Thread
New Reply
Print Thread
Rate This Thread
#127308 - 07/24/15 06:13 PM Is yelling ever appropriate?  
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 38
Gg1j18 Offline
Back of THE CAGE
Gg1j18  Offline
Back of THE CAGE

Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 38
USA WRESTLING IS YELLING IN YOUTH WRESTLING EVER APPROPRIATE

Is Yelling in Youth Wrestling Ever Appropriate

Email
Print
BY MATT KRUMRIE | JULY 23, 2015, 8:19 P.M. (ET)
Everyone who’s attended a match or game in youth sports has experienced it—someone directing loud comments at a player, coach, referee, or even another fan. And while cheering on youth athletes has many positive aspects and should be encouraged, it can be a slippery slope from engaging in constructive morale-boosting to dishing out intrusive, verbal abuse.
A good rule of thumb is to ask would yelling be appropriate in a normal situation, says Mike Clayton, Manager of the National Coaches Education Program (NCEP) for USA Wrestling. If a child is doing something that could imminently injure him/herself, for example, that would warrant yelling to keep the athlete safe. But such cases, he notes, are rare.
"Unfortunately, most yelling isn’t designed to help the young athlete as much as it is to allow the adult to vent their frustrations," Clayton says. "While that isn’t what the adult intends to communicate, the child still feels shame and fear. Kids release that shame and fear by often underperforming or by being angry in matches or practice."
As parents and coaches get excited while watching a competition, Clayton explains that their bodies can release hormones to make them hyper-alert and energized. This physical change cancause otherwise calm and rational people to say things that don’t fit the situation.
To combat this, Clayton says adults should try to carefully watch both their words and their tone when interacting around young athletes. Improved awareness will make for happier youngsters and improve retention, he adds.
Jim Harshaw, a former Division I coach and wrestler and author of the ebook How to Successfully Deal with Sports Parents, also says that the emphasis should be on tone, rather than volume, of the voice when dealing with young athletes. "You may have to yell to get your point across or to ensure that your voice is audible over the noise in the competition venue," Harshaw notes. But he says studies have shown athletes want more positive reinforcement during competition. “Yelling can be positive and a motivator or yelling can be negative and detract from motivation.”
The question really comes down to what you are trying to achieve by yelling.
A coach that yells a lot could be trying to compensate for a lack of experience and teaching skills, says Jim Moulsoff, head coach of the 2015 NCAA Division III national champion Augsburg College wrestling team. Effective teachers and coaches can still get their message across in other ways without yelling, and can even do so with intensity, says Moulsoff.
"Coaches who yell often lack the skills to be effective communicators and struggle to hold their athletes accountable for their actions," says Moulsoff. And he notes that, many times, yelling in youth sports is a learned behavior, modeled on how coaches and fans act at professional or college sports events seen on TV.
"It's what they think good coaching is, but isn't what is needed at the youth level," Moulsoff says. The human brain is not fully developed until the age of 25, he notes, so young athletes often perceive yelling in a way it isn't intended. "Youth sports are for development and should be fun," he emphasizes. "Winning is fun, but so is learning how to win and be successful. When both the coach and athlete learn to trust each other, they will understand the expectations.”
Few kids in youth sports end up being great athletes. Most participate in sports to help discover who they are as an individual and to learn about life skills like teamwork, commitment and sacrifice. The number one reason why kids—especially kids who aren't in it to be great athletes—quit youth sports, Moulsoff says, is because of people who ruin the fun atmosphere by focusing only on winning and losing.
David Jacobson of the Positive Coaching Alliance says yelling during youth sports must not be about negative, personal attacks. "There is never any excuse in a youth or high school sports environment for demeaning others," he says. Doing so can have extraordinarily adverse effects, such as humiliation of those targeted, which may lead to their quitting the team or sport, withdrawing from the social network of the team and depression, he says. Demeaning behavior also hurts the reputation of the team/school/organization, causing it to be looked at poorly by members of the community. Finally, he adds that yelling rarely works as a sustainable motivational force on athletes.
“Research shows that young athletes participate in sports because their friends do it and it's fun,” says Harshaw. "Winning is certainly fun too. But yelling isn't the best way to drive an athlete to peak performance."
Resources from the Positive Coaching Alliance and the PCADevZone.org:

How Parents Can Help Kids Learn Despite A Yelling Coach

Football coach Marc Trestman On Yelling At Players

Women's soccer coach Erin Chastain: Too Much Yelling Has No Place In Youth Sports

Comments

Top Reply Quote
BACK OF THE CAGE SPONSORS

#127314 - 07/24/15 08:02 PM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Gg1j18]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


Originally Posted by Gg1j18
USA WRESTLING IS YELLING IN YOUTH WRESTLING EVER APPROPRIATE

Is Yelling in Youth Wrestling Ever Appropriate

Email
Print
BY MATT KRUMRIE | JULY 23, 2015, 8:19 P.M. (ET)
Everyone who’s attended a match or game in youth sports has experienced it—someone directing loud comments at a player, coach, referee, or even another fan. And while cheering on youth athletes has many positive aspects and should be encouraged, it can be a slippery slope from engaging in constructive morale-boosting to dishing out intrusive, verbal abuse.
A good rule of thumb is to ask would yelling be appropriate in a normal situation, says Mike Clayton, Manager of the National Coaches Education Program (NCEP) for USA Wrestling. If a child is doing something that could imminently injure him/herself, for example, that would warrant yelling to keep the athlete safe. But such cases, he notes, are rare.
"Unfortunately, most yelling isn’t designed to help the young athlete as much as it is to allow the adult to vent their frustrations," Clayton says. "While that isn’t what the adult intends to communicate, the child still feels shame and fear. Kids release that shame and fear by often underperforming or by being angry in matches or practice."
As parents and coaches get excited while watching a competition, Clayton explains that their bodies can release hormones to make them hyper-alert and energized. This physical change cancause otherwise calm and rational people to say things that don’t fit the situation.
To combat this, Clayton says adults should try to carefully watch both their words and their tone when interacting around young athletes. Improved awareness will make for happier youngsters and improve retention, he adds.
Jim Harshaw, a former Division I coach and wrestler and author of the ebook How to Successfully Deal with Sports Parents, also says that the emphasis should be on tone, rather than volume, of the voice when dealing with young athletes. "You may have to yell to get your point across or to ensure that your voice is audible over the noise in the competition venue," Harshaw notes. But he says studies have shown athletes want more positive reinforcement during competition. “Yelling can be positive and a motivator or yelling can be negative and detract from motivation.”
The question really comes down to what you are trying to achieve by yelling.
A coach that yells a lot could be trying to compensate for a lack of experience and teaching skills, says Jim Moulsoff, head coach of the 2015 NCAA Division III national champion Augsburg College wrestling team. Effective teachers and coaches can still get their message across in other ways without yelling, and can even do so with intensity, says Moulsoff.
"Coaches who yell often lack the skills to be effective communicators and struggle to hold their athletes accountable for their actions," says Moulsoff. And he notes that, many times, yelling in youth sports is a learned behavior, modeled on how coaches and fans act at professional or college sports events seen on TV.
"It's what they think good coaching is, but isn't what is needed at the youth level," Moulsoff says. The human brain is not fully developed until the age of 25, he notes, so young athletes often perceive yelling in a way it isn't intended. "Youth sports are for development and should be fun," he emphasizes. "Winning is fun, but so is learning how to win and be successful. When both the coach and athlete learn to trust each other, they will understand the expectations.”
Few kids in youth sports end up being great athletes. Most participate in sports to help discover who they are as an individual and to learn about life skills like teamwork, commitment and sacrifice. The number one reason why kids—especially kids who aren't in it to be great athletes—quit youth sports, Moulsoff says, is because of people who ruin the fun atmosphere by focusing only on winning and losing.
David Jacobson of the Positive Coaching Alliance says yelling during youth sports must not be about negative, personal attacks. "There is never any excuse in a youth or high school sports environment for demeaning others," he says. Doing so can have extraordinarily adverse effects, such as humiliation of those targeted, which may lead to their quitting the team or sport, withdrawing from the social network of the team and depression, he says. Demeaning behavior also hurts the reputation of the team/school/organization, causing it to be looked at poorly by members of the community. Finally, he adds that yelling rarely works as a sustainable motivational force on athletes.
“Research shows that young athletes participate in sports because their friends do it and it's fun,” says Harshaw. "Winning is certainly fun too. But yelling isn't the best way to drive an athlete to peak performance."
Resources from the Positive Coaching Alliance and the PCADevZone.org:

How Parents Can Help Kids Learn Despite A Yelling Coach

Football coach Marc Trestman On Yelling At Players

Women's soccer coach Erin Chastain: Too Much Yelling Has No Place In Youth Sports

Comments
sometimes things get intense in the heat of a game and sometimes you have to yell over the crowd. if the yelling isn't to bash or embarrass a player I see nothing wrong with it. also yelling at officials is unacceptable also. I won't tolerate any of my coaches doing it.

Top Reply Quote
#127326 - 07/24/15 08:45 PM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Anonymous]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Gg1j18
USA WRESTLING IS YELLING IN YOUTH WRESTLING EVER APPROPRIATE

Is Yelling in Youth Wrestling Ever Appropriate

Email
Print
BY MATT KRUMRIE | JULY 23, 2015, 8:19 P.M. (ET)
Everyone who’s attended a match or game in youth sports has experienced it—someone directing loud comments at a player, coach, referee, or even another fan. And while cheering on youth athletes has many positive aspects and should be encouraged, it can be a slippery slope from engaging in constructive morale-boosting to dishing out intrusive, verbal abuse.
A good rule of thumb is to ask would yelling be appropriate in a normal situation, says Mike Clayton, Manager of the National Coaches Education Program (NCEP) for USA Wrestling. If a child is doing something that could imminently injure him/herself, for example, that would warrant yelling to keep the athlete safe. But such cases, he notes, are rare.
"Unfortunately, most yelling isn’t designed to help the young athlete as much as it is to allow the adult to vent their frustrations," Clayton says. "While that isn’t what the adult intends to communicate, the child still feels shame and fear. Kids release that shame and fear by often underperforming or by being angry in matches or practice."
As parents and coaches get excited while watching a competition, Clayton explains that their bodies can release hormones to make them hyper-alert and energized. This physical change cancause otherwise calm and rational people to say things that don’t fit the situation.
To combat this, Clayton says adults should try to carefully watch both their words and their tone when interacting around young athletes. Improved awareness will make for happier youngsters and improve retention, he adds.
Jim Harshaw, a former Division I coach and wrestler and author of the ebook How to Successfully Deal with Sports Parents, also says that the emphasis should be on tone, rather than volume, of the voice when dealing with young athletes. "You may have to yell to get your point across or to ensure that your voice is audible over the noise in the competition venue," Harshaw notes. But he says studies have shown athletes want more positive reinforcement during competition. “Yelling can be positive and a motivator or yelling can be negative and detract from motivation.”
The question really comes down to what you are trying to achieve by yelling.
A coach that yells a lot could be trying to compensate for a lack of experience and teaching skills, says Jim Moulsoff, head coach of the 2015 NCAA Division III national champion Augsburg College wrestling team. Effective teachers and coaches can still get their message across in other ways without yelling, and can even do so with intensity, says Moulsoff.
"Coaches who yell often lack the skills to be effective communicators and struggle to hold their athletes accountable for their actions," says Moulsoff. And he notes that, many times, yelling in youth sports is a learned behavior, modeled on how coaches and fans act at professional or college sports events seen on TV.
"It's what they think good coaching is, but isn't what is needed at the youth level," Moulsoff says. The human brain is not fully developed until the age of 25, he notes, so young athletes often perceive yelling in a way it isn't intended. "Youth sports are for development and should be fun," he emphasizes. "Winning is fun, but so is learning how to win and be successful. When both the coach and athlete learn to trust each other, they will understand the expectations.”
Few kids in youth sports end up being great athletes. Most participate in sports to help discover who they are as an individual and to learn about life skills like teamwork, commitment and sacrifice. The number one reason why kids—especially kids who aren't in it to be great athletes—quit youth sports, Moulsoff says, is because of people who ruin the fun atmosphere by focusing only on winning and losing.
David Jacobson of the Positive Coaching Alliance says yelling during youth sports must not be about negative, personal attacks. "There is never any excuse in a youth or high school sports environment for demeaning others," he says. Doing so can have extraordinarily adverse effects, such as humiliation of those targeted, which may lead to their quitting the team or sport, withdrawing from the social network of the team and depression, he says. Demeaning behavior also hurts the reputation of the team/school/organization, causing it to be looked at poorly by members of the community. Finally, he adds that yelling rarely works as a sustainable motivational force on athletes.
“Research shows that young athletes participate in sports because their friends do it and it's fun,” says Harshaw. "Winning is certainly fun too. But yelling isn't the best way to drive an athlete to peak performance."
Resources from the Positive Coaching Alliance and the PCADevZone.org:

How Parents Can Help Kids Learn Despite A Yelling Coach

Football coach Marc Trestman On Yelling At Players

Women's soccer coach Erin Chastain: Too Much Yelling Has No Place In Youth Sports

Comments
sometimes things get intense in the heat of a game and sometimes you have to yell over the crowd. if the yelling isn't to bash or embarrass a player I see nothing wrong with it. also yelling at officials is unacceptable also. I won't tolerate any of my coaches doing it.


I hate when parents yell at or correct kids that aren't theirs.

Top Reply Quote
#127328 - 07/24/15 08:50 PM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Anonymous]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Gg1j18
USA WRESTLING IS YELLING IN YOUTH WRESTLING EVER APPROPRIATE

Is Yelling in Youth Wrestling Ever Appropriate

Email
Print
BY MATT KRUMRIE | JULY 23, 2015, 8:19 P.M. (ET)
Everyone who’s attended a match or game in youth sports has experienced it—someone directing loud comments at a player, coach, referee, or even another fan. And while cheering on youth athletes has many positive aspects and should be encouraged, it can be a slippery slope from engaging in constructive morale-boosting to dishing out intrusive, verbal abuse.
A good rule of thumb is to ask would yelling be appropriate in a normal situation, says Mike Clayton, Manager of the National Coaches Education Program (NCEP) for USA Wrestling. If a child is doing something that could imminently injure him/herself, for example, that would warrant yelling to keep the athlete safe. But such cases, he notes, are rare.
"Unfortunately, most yelling isn’t designed to help the young athlete as much as it is to allow the adult to vent their frustrations," Clayton says. "While that isn’t what the adult intends to communicate, the child still feels shame and fear. Kids release that shame and fear by often underperforming or by being angry in matches or practice."
As parents and coaches get excited while watching a competition, Clayton explains that their bodies can release hormones to make them hyper-alert and energized. This physical change cancause otherwise calm and rational people to say things that don’t fit the situation.
To combat this, Clayton says adults should try to carefully watch both their words and their tone when interacting around young athletes. Improved awareness will make for happier youngsters and improve retention, he adds.
Jim Harshaw, a former Division I coach and wrestler and author of the ebook How to Successfully Deal with Sports Parents, also says that the emphasis should be on tone, rather than volume, of the voice when dealing with young athletes. "You may have to yell to get your point across or to ensure that your voice is audible over the noise in the competition venue," Harshaw notes. But he says studies have shown athletes want more positive reinforcement during competition. “Yelling can be positive and a motivator or yelling can be negative and detract from motivation.”
The question really comes down to what you are trying to achieve by yelling.
A coach that yells a lot could be trying to compensate for a lack of experience and teaching skills, says Jim Moulsoff, head coach of the 2015 NCAA Division III national champion Augsburg College wrestling team. Effective teachers and coaches can still get their message across in other ways without yelling, and can even do so with intensity, says Moulsoff.
"Coaches who yell often lack the skills to be effective communicators and struggle to hold their athletes accountable for their actions," says Moulsoff. And he notes that, many times, yelling in youth sports is a learned behavior, modeled on how coaches and fans act at professional or college sports events seen on TV.
"It's what they think good coaching is, but isn't what is needed at the youth level," Moulsoff says. The human brain is not fully developed until the age of 25, he notes, so young athletes often perceive yelling in a way it isn't intended. "Youth sports are for development and should be fun," he emphasizes. "Winning is fun, but so is learning how to win and be successful. When both the coach and athlete learn to trust each other, they will understand the expectations.”
Few kids in youth sports end up being great athletes. Most participate in sports to help discover who they are as an individual and to learn about life skills like teamwork, commitment and sacrifice. The number one reason why kids—especially kids who aren't in it to be great athletes—quit youth sports, Moulsoff says, is because of people who ruin the fun atmosphere by focusing only on winning and losing.
David Jacobson of the Positive Coaching Alliance says yelling during youth sports must not be about negative, personal attacks. "There is never any excuse in a youth or high school sports environment for demeaning others," he says. Doing so can have extraordinarily adverse effects, such as humiliation of those targeted, which may lead to their quitting the team or sport, withdrawing from the social network of the team and depression, he says. Demeaning behavior also hurts the reputation of the team/school/organization, causing it to be looked at poorly by members of the community. Finally, he adds that yelling rarely works as a sustainable motivational force on athletes.
“Research shows that young athletes participate in sports because their friends do it and it's fun,” says Harshaw. "Winning is certainly fun too. But yelling isn't the best way to drive an athlete to peak performance."
Resources from the Positive Coaching Alliance and the PCADevZone.org:

How Parents Can Help Kids Learn Despite A Yelling Coach

Football coach Marc Trestman On Yelling At Players

Women's soccer coach Erin Chastain: Too Much Yelling Has No Place In Youth Sports

Comments
sometimes things get intense in the heat of a game and sometimes you have to yell over the crowd. if the yelling isn't to bash or embarrass a player I see nothing wrong with it. also yelling at officials is unacceptable also. I won't tolerate any of my coaches doing it.


I hate when parents yell at or correct kids that aren't theirs.


Gonna be a long hard road for you in competitive athletics

Top Reply Quote
#127331 - 07/24/15 08:58 PM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Anonymous]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Gg1j18
USA WRESTLING IS YELLING IN YOUTH WRESTLING EVER APPROPRIATE

Is Yelling in Youth Wrestling Ever Appropriate

Email
Print
BY MATT KRUMRIE | JULY 23, 2015, 8:19 P.M. (ET)
Everyone who’s attended a match or game in youth sports has experienced it—someone directing loud comments at a player, coach, referee, or even another fan. And while cheering on youth athletes has many positive aspects and should be encouraged, it can be a slippery slope from engaging in constructive morale-boosting to dishing out intrusive, verbal abuse.
A good rule of thumb is to ask would yelling be appropriate in a normal situation, says Mike Clayton, Manager of the National Coaches Education Program (NCEP) for USA Wrestling. If a child is doing something that could imminently injure him/herself, for example, that would warrant yelling to keep the athlete safe. But such cases, he notes, are rare.
"Unfortunately, most yelling isn’t designed to help the young athlete as much as it is to allow the adult to vent their frustrations," Clayton says. "While that isn’t what the adult intends to communicate, the child still feels shame and fear. Kids release that shame and fear by often underperforming or by being angry in matches or practice."
As parents and coaches get excited while watching a competition, Clayton explains that their bodies can release hormones to make them hyper-alert and energized. This physical change cancause otherwise calm and rational people to say things that don’t fit the situation.
To combat this, Clayton says adults should try to carefully watch both their words and their tone when interacting around young athletes. Improved awareness will make for happier youngsters and improve retention, he adds.
Jim Harshaw, a former Division I coach and wrestler and author of the ebook How to Successfully Deal with Sports Parents, also says that the emphasis should be on tone, rather than volume, of the voice when dealing with young athletes. "You may have to yell to get your point across or to ensure that your voice is audible over the noise in the competition venue," Harshaw notes. But he says studies have shown athletes want more positive reinforcement during competition. “Yelling can be positive and a motivator or yelling can be negative and detract from motivation.”
The question really comes down to what you are trying to achieve by yelling.
A coach that yells a lot could be trying to compensate for a lack of experience and teaching skills, says Jim Moulsoff, head coach of the 2015 NCAA Division III national champion Augsburg College wrestling team. Effective teachers and coaches can still get their message across in other ways without yelling, and can even do so with intensity, says Moulsoff.
"Coaches who yell often lack the skills to be effective communicators and struggle to hold their athletes accountable for their actions," says Moulsoff. And he notes that, many times, yelling in youth sports is a learned behavior, modeled on how coaches and fans act at professional or college sports events seen on TV.
"It's what they think good coaching is, but isn't what is needed at the youth level," Moulsoff says. The human brain is not fully developed until the age of 25, he notes, so young athletes often perceive yelling in a way it isn't intended. "Youth sports are for development and should be fun," he emphasizes. "Winning is fun, but so is learning how to win and be successful. When both the coach and athlete learn to trust each other, they will understand the expectations.”
Few kids in youth sports end up being great athletes. Most participate in sports to help discover who they are as an individual and to learn about life skills like teamwork, commitment and sacrifice. The number one reason why kids—especially kids who aren't in it to be great athletes—quit youth sports, Moulsoff says, is because of people who ruin the fun atmosphere by focusing only on winning and losing.
David Jacobson of the Positive Coaching Alliance says yelling during youth sports must not be about negative, personal attacks. "There is never any excuse in a youth or high school sports environment for demeaning others," he says. Doing so can have extraordinarily adverse effects, such as humiliation of those targeted, which may lead to their quitting the team or sport, withdrawing from the social network of the team and depression, he says. Demeaning behavior also hurts the reputation of the team/school/organization, causing it to be looked at poorly by members of the community. Finally, he adds that yelling rarely works as a sustainable motivational force on athletes.
“Research shows that young athletes participate in sports because their friends do it and it's fun,” says Harshaw. "Winning is certainly fun too. But yelling isn't the best way to drive an athlete to peak performance."
Resources from the Positive Coaching Alliance and the PCADevZone.org:

How Parents Can Help Kids Learn Despite A Yelling Coach

Football coach Marc Trestman On Yelling At Players

Women's soccer coach Erin Chastain: Too Much Yelling Has No Place In Youth Sports

Comments
sometimes things get intense in the heat of a game and sometimes you have to yell over the crowd. if the yelling isn't to bash or embarrass a player I see nothing wrong with it. also yelling at officials is unacceptable also. I won't tolerate any of my coaches doing it.


I hate when parents yell at or correct kids that aren't theirs.


Gonna be a long hard road for you in competitive athletics
so bcuz the previous poster doesn't like to hear other parents scream and correct kids that aren't theirs then it's gonna be a long hard road in competitive sports for them? yeah you're definitely a parent I'd call a time out for and tell them to watch the game from their car. I've done it before. don't be that parent bro. don't yell at other people's kids.

Top Reply Quote
Sponsored Links
#127346 - 07/25/15 05:44 AM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Gg1j18]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


"Long hard road"
Too funny. The hard road is going to be for those parents that spend the time living their DEAD dreams through their kids and have never played organized sports beyond third grade. Those are the parents that do the most yelling and freaking out on the sidelines. They've never felt the pressure of a game on the field, rink or court and this is as close as they have ever gotten to it.

Top Reply Quote
#127349 - 07/25/15 06:43 AM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Gg1j18]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


this is a great topic:

We've rushed our kids into many things and I think competitive Sports is one of them. I admit I did it. But because of this many times we (coaches) need to use a game as a scrimmage situation or practice. And yes, that comes with yelling at times. But yelling in the sense of being loud and making a point to be heard but not to belittle or single out a player.

I mentioned we rushed these kids into these sports. By that I mean we clearly do not have enough practice and development time to teach and mentor these kids so they can go out there and make a mistake and try to learn how to get out of it and compensate for it. So as coaches we need to DIRECT LOUDLY until the day we can sit back and give them a game plan and say go execute. When that day comes then we can stay quieter and pull them to the side when a situation needs to be addressed or corrected. Until that time, yes, I think being loud is appropriate and necessary.

Now if you coach a team for a few years, with little turn over that yelling should simmer down. but at times there will still be a burst here and there.

But the question was - Is yelling appropriate, great question! What is yelling? Some people may asked that. We have all seen the blogs and jokes about how someone says they are not yelling just talking loudly. So to one's mind do they even know they are yelling. Others say we have turned soft.

A note of Puss- i- fication of America. As George Carlin says what happened to the US. Harley Davidson has a theme restaurant. NO that just aignt right. Others State the no child left behind pushed this further which led to the ideology that everyone should get a participation medal. Now guess what, we even have some AD's in schools saying winning and losing isn't important its the experience. WHAT!

But I believe the topic is centered around the non coach (or worse coach) parent on the sidelines. We all know those people. Some are our friends, some we despise. But the really sad part is I really havnt seen many that yell or directed from the sideline that didn't know what they were doing. As a parent it is annoying we just want to say STFU (but in reality many times they are saying what I want to). As a coach it grates at you but as a coach (ill admit) it does shed light to things we had not seen.

Ever see one of those uber competitive 7/8/9 grade teams play? Not many parents barking out orders, on those teams. Why, Fear? Sure maybe! or maybe they know the coach and if they stay quiet a few moments longer the coach will catch it and correct or direct.

Then we have those that just blurt out things, these people usually have Solo cups somewhere nearby. No excuse for those!

Top Reply Quote
#127358 - 07/25/15 09:09 AM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Anonymous]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


Originally Posted by Anonymous
"Long hard road"
Too funny. The hard road is going to be for those parents that spend the time living their DEAD dreams through their kids and have never played organized sports beyond third grade. Those are the parents that do the most yelling and freaking out on the sidelines. They've never felt the pressure of a game on the field, rink or court and this is as close as they have ever gotten to it.
Great post. Shame the idiot that originally said it's gonna be a long hard road isnt responding bcuz he and his third grader are lifting weights.

Top Reply Quote
#127751 - 07/27/15 05:38 PM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Gg1j18]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


Some officials need to be yelled at the girls are working hard, the coaches are working hard and the officials are going through the motions. That's an insult to all the parties involved. In a 2015 semi final playoff game in the A division the official called the ball out of bounds because he was looking at the wrong lines late in the second half, maybe if he moved his lazy [lacrosse] this should never happen. The game has passed you by Old Man time to hang it up you all know the guy. Wrong call after wrong call it was utterly embarrassing and he got screamed at by everyone and it was well deserved. It's not easy but put an effort into it the kids deserve it.

Top Reply Quote
#127753 - 07/27/15 05:46 PM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Anonymous]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


Originally Posted by Anonymous
Some officials need to be yelled at the girls are working hard, the coaches are working hard and the officials are going through the motions. That's an insult to all the parties involved. In a 2015 semi final playoff game in the A division the official called the ball out of bounds because he was looking at the wrong lines late in the second half, maybe if he moved his lazy [lacrosse] this should never happen. The game has passed you by Old Man time to hang it up you all know the guy. Wrong call after wrong call it was utterly embarrassing and he got screamed at by everyone and it was well deserved. It's not easy but put an effort into it the kids deserve it.


too many teams now and not enough good coaches and not enough good referees!

Top Reply Quote
Sponsored Links
#127755 - 07/27/15 05:58 PM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Anonymous]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
"Long hard road"
Too funny. The hard road is going to be for those parents that spend the time living their DEAD dreams through their kids and have never played organized sports beyond third grade. Those are the parents that do the most yelling and freaking out on the sidelines. They've never felt the pressure of a game on the field, rink or court and this is as close as they have ever gotten to it.
Great post. Shame the idiot that originally said it's gonna be a long hard road isnt responding bcuz he and his third grader are lifting weights.

I wonder what they are going to do when it's not fun for their kid anymore and they don't want to keep playing....
I saw too many of those "parents" over the weekend. It was very entertaining. Yes, parents - you know who you are and yes, we were laughing at you. There were no college coaches watching - you got lucky....

Top Reply Quote
#128032 - 07/29/15 01:27 PM Re: Is yelling ever appropriate? [Re: Gg1j18]  

**DONOTDELETE**
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered


sad, so many push the kids past where the kid either cares or has the talent. frustrated yellers who will not face reality.

Top Reply Quote
Quick Reply

Options
HTML is disabled
UBBCode is enabled
Image Verification




TOURNAMENTS/SHOWCASES
Harding Battle by the Bay
Harding Summer Sunset
Andy Forsberg Memorial Lacrosse Tournament
JC17 Memorial Shootout for Dreams
New York Lacrosse Academy Boy's HS Showcase
LI Girl's Showcase
LI Boy's Showcase
CAMPS & CLINICS
Girl's Shooting & Dodging Clinic w/ U. of Oregon Coach Michelle Tumolo
NOTB Boy's Box Lacrosse Training
NOTB Girl's Box Lacrosse Training
Boy's Shooting & Dodging Clinic
Lax Clinics at The Athlete Zone
Long Island Lady Outlaws Girl's Lacrosse Clinic
Long Island Outlaws Boy's Lacrosse Clinic
LACROSSE COMPANY'S
Lacrosse Unlimited Team Sales
LEAGUES
Boys Winter 7v7 Indoor Lacrosse League
Harding Fall Twilight-Sept 14th 2018
BOTC SPONSORS

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER



Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0