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Recruiting stories from the road. Share your experience.
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If you have been through the process of college recruiting please share your insight.

http://m.bleacherreport.com/article...dium=referral&utm_campaign=editorial

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I have always thought that lacrosse referees are the most sensitive guys in sports. Not growing up playing lacrosse, I've always watched how reactive they are when anything they do is questioned. Even the slightest criticism from coach or fan and i've seen many lose their mind. Do not see that in other sports. Seems like football and basketball refs have a higher tolerance. Soccer officials have the most. Which leads me to my real point. It also seems that in lacrosse recruiting there is ALWAYS mentioned about the parents....always. I don't see that in other sports? Why is that. Do you think that when Nick Saban recruits a 5 star running back from Alabama that his parents are a huge part of the package? I doubt. Obviously you want good parents but who cares? How much of a problem can a parent be at the Divison 1 level or any level? Not getting it? Someone jump in here and give your best.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
I have always thought that lacrosse referees are the most sensitive guys in sports. Not growing up playing lacrosse, I've always watched how reactive they are when anything they do is questioned. Even the slightest criticism from coach or fan and i've seen many lose their mind. Do not see that in other sports. Seems like football and basketball refs have a higher tolerance. Soccer officials have the most. Which leads me to my real point. It also seems that in lacrosse recruiting there is ALWAYS mentioned about the parents....always. I don't see that in other sports? Why is that. Do you think that when Nick Saban recruits a 5 star running back from Alabama that his parents are a huge part of the package? I doubt. Obviously you want good parents but who cares? How much of a problem can a parent be at the Divison 1 level or any level? Not getting it? Someone jump in here and give your best.



I would say most refs today have played lacrosse at least the HS level if not the College level.

Parents are involved because coaches are recruiting 13 year olds!!!! That is the problem. If you leave it up tp a 13 or 14 year old to negotiate his future (if your kid is a blue chip) you will be disappointed!!

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Originally Posted by The Hop

If you have been through the process of college recruiting please share your insight.




Great topic! Clicked on link and it says page doesn't exist, but I hope we get some postings here from those who have had experience.

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Originally Posted by The Hop


It worked thank you, that was a great story. Kind of scary to think a coach can change his or her mind but in a way makes me feel better that my parents won't let me give a verbal unitil 11th grade.

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Just wanting for a true commit to de commit and select another school. I have my eye on a few 2017/2018's

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We have been through the process and the travel club scene coupled with very lose if any guidelines on early verbals is out of hand. As stated on another thread parents boast that their kid makes Blue or top team even if they don't play, then they boast on the summer sideline that their 7th or 8th grader got called up to varsity, then all the talk last summer was about the kids that committed before entering 9th grade! The only way a 14 year old is picking a college that FITS at 14 is if their parents said it was a fit for them. My kid wasn't a top 25 d1 lacrosse kid, so we waited and picked a school that was strong academically and that they wanted to be at even if the lax didn't work out. The hardest part was keeping my kid from picking a school just because a coach "had money" because every kid and most travel parents eyes light up

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Hop, if you ever called homewood home, met your wife at school and had a 14 yo top player. That would be a good fit!

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Hop, if you ever called homewood home, met your wife at school and had a 14 yo top player. That would be a good fit!


Ok....


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Originally Posted by Anonymous
We have been through the process and the travel club scene coupled with very lose if any guidelines on early verbals is out of hand. As stated on another thread parents boast that their kid makes Blue or top team even if they don't play, then they boast on the summer sideline that their 7th or 8th grader got called up to varsity, then all the talk last summer was about the kids that committed before entering 9th grade! The only way a 14 year old is picking a college that FITS at 14 is if their parents said it was a fit for them. My kid wasn't a top 25 d1 lacrosse kid, so we waited and picked a school that was strong academically and that they wanted to be at even if the lax didn't work out. The hardest part was keeping my kid from picking a school just because a coach "had money" because every kid and most travel parents eyes light up


Not really sure I understand your comment. If some kid commits at 14 and gets offered $ to play lax, what is so bad? THe schools that are in the early commit game are among our top educational institutions. A kid that gets an early nod is at a significant advantage because the $ for lax is very limited.

Good fit? Come on, more than half the kids picking schools in their senior year don't know what will be a good fit...nor do they know what they want to study. That is what most people figure out in the first two years of school.

If it was a bad fit, transfer. If the coach pulled your offer-as indicated in the bleacher report article, find another home. If the coach quits before you get to school, find another home...

These kids that commit early have full flexibility, if something better comes along, they can take it. Sorry to the people that feel differently, but let's all be honest, there is no downside to committing early as just as the coach can back out, the kid can back out. I would love to know the percentage of coaches that have pulled verbal offers. Other than for academic reasons, i bet the percentage is extremely low.

Why does anyone care? Why not just tell the kid congratulations, I hope it all works out for you really well...If your kid is getting offers but you think it is just too soon and you can afford the full $45-60k per year, wait.

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I have seen many examples of early verbals at my son's club, his prep school, his prep league and amongst rival clubs and in the prep or public HS leagues around here. My son also got Twitter friendly with out of area kids from other elite clubs. He is a 2017 and was "not committed" until recently and now is what we maybe could call a "non-public verbal" to a school that is no fan of early announcements of these things. Fine with our family and our club owner has been pleasantly cool about it, but I am always both amazed and dismayed how many times other parental inquiring minds who want to know ask what is wrong with our son because he seems to be a decent player but is not committed. What is wrong? He gets it from his friends and takes it well considering he is 15. But this wears and wears on the kids who are checking the Twitter constantly to measure up who is getting committed versus who isn't. Let's be blunt here: if your 2017 or 2018 son needs to be committed in a month or your family is headed into therapy for clinical depression, here is my recruiting guide:
1. Get your club owner to dial up some 8th tier academic school that has "D1 lacrosse" status bar and beg the coach for a spot. If the kid is an ok player Furman, Bellarmine, Mt. St. Marys, UMBC and the like will take him, especially if you don't get all pedantic about scholarship money. Costs them nothing for something and a lof of college coaches are going in for that now. Rosters closing in on 60...half the kids can't play, no problem. It isn't like the school won't be getting 30 full tuition paying students. Nobody is the victim.
2. Go upmarket and beg beg beg beg a top 20 D1 program via the club and prep school coaches who can shove your kid down a coach's throat as a nothing attached verbal. No money, just a spot please. A shocking number of top 20 program coaches will humor this. See #1. And Ty Xanders is confused why JHU is carrying 6 goalies?!? Seems more and more like he doesn't have a clue about recruiting and it is supposedly his profession.
3. Once your kid is verballed, by all means that opens the sieve for you -- the parent -- to not shop it, but also entertain what other offers may come 1-3 years later. If the kid is a great student and was committed to Furman but Duke calls, well, duhhhh who is throwing a rock at your kid or you for playing the game? I honestly think that 8th or 9th or even 10th grade verbals are considered at least in part "placeholders" to lock in a status, be viewed more favorably by parent or kid peers (and is very very important to both), get your kid ranked by some recruiting guide guy and to honey pot more bees to offer your kid later.
4. The draconian route, ignore it. Implore your kid to enjoy playing club and HS and do your best to teach your son that if he really really wants to play D1 lacrosse he can walk right on at the D1 schools that a cat who isn't dead yet could be admitted to and no coach won't love a capable practice player or will the bursars office at that university. If by now you have not figured out the economics of lacrosse, let me explain it very simply: if you need financial help to put your kid through college you are better off "committing to the financial aid process" than taking a lacrosse partial, and if your kid is a very good student to boot "committing to the academic merit scholarship process" is a walk off home run versus a come with $1,500-$20,000 scholarship being amortized out by a lacrosse coach.
5. No wait, this is the part where anonymous dads post that is just not true, their kid is getting a full ride!!!!!!!!! When one of you guys meets another lacrosse parent of a committed 2017 or 2018 who IS NOT getting a full ride, be sure and let us know. There is not such a thing I know of.

As a practical matter, as parents we'd be better parents if we take the game back from the salesmen in the lacrosse trade. 12-18 year old kids deserve enjoyment and their own fulfillment out of sports and it is silly to take it away from them for a Twitter banner that may read Johnny Lax, XYZ HS 2018, Johns Hopkins 2022. When I was a freshman in high school I don't think I ever thought of what the calendar year of my college graduation would be and would have needed to look it up. I wasn't the brightest kid, but I was normal to not think about that. What 2018 lacrosse kid doesn't know without thinking or counting he is a 2022 college year?

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
I have seen many examples of early verbals at my son's club, his prep school, his prep league and amongst rival clubs and in the prep or public HS leagues around here. My son also got Twitter friendly with out of area kids from other elite clubs. He is a 2017 and was "not committed" until recently and now is what we maybe could call a "non-public verbal" to a school that is no fan of early announcements of these things. Fine with our family and our club owner has been pleasantly cool about it, but I am always both amazed and dismayed how many times other parental inquiring minds who want to know ask what is wrong with our son because he seems to be a decent player but is not committed. What is wrong? He gets it from his friends and takes it well considering he is 15. But this wears and wears on the kids who are checking the Twitter constantly to measure up who is getting committed versus who isn't. Let's be blunt here: if your 2017 or 2018 son needs to be committed in a month or your family is headed into therapy for clinical depression, here is my recruiting guide:
1. Get your club owner to dial up some 8th tier academic school that has "D1 lacrosse" status bar and beg the coach for a spot. If the kid is an ok player Furman, Bellarmine, Mt. St. Marys, UMBC and the like will take him, especially if you don't get all pedantic about scholarship money. Costs them nothing for something and a lof of college coaches are going in for that now. Rosters closing in on 60...half the kids can't play, no problem. It isn't like the school won't be getting 30 full tuition paying students. Nobody is the victim.
2. Go upmarket and beg beg beg beg a top 20 D1 program via the club and prep school coaches who can shove your kid down a coach's throat as a nothing attached verbal. No money, just a spot please. A shocking number of top 20 program coaches will humor this. See #1. And Ty Xanders is confused why JHU is carrying 6 goalies?!? Seems more and more like he doesn't have a clue about recruiting and it is supposedly his profession.
3. Once your kid is verballed, by all means that opens the sieve for you -- the parent -- to not shop it, but also entertain what other offers may come 1-3 years later. If the kid is a great student and was committed to Furman but Duke calls, well, duhhhh who is throwing a rock at your kid or you for playing the game? I honestly think that 8th or 9th or even 10th grade verbals are considered at least in part "placeholders" to lock in a status, be viewed more favorably by parent or kid peers (and is very very important to both), get your kid ranked by some recruiting guide guy and to honey pot more bees to offer your kid later.
4. The draconian route, ignore it. Implore your kid to enjoy playing club and HS and do your best to teach your son that if he really really wants to play D1 lacrosse he can walk right on at the D1 schools that a cat who isn't dead yet could be admitted to and no coach won't love a capable practice player or will the bursars office at that university. If by now you have not figured out the economics of lacrosse, let me explain it very simply: if you need financial help to put your kid through college you are better off "committing to the financial aid process" than taking a lacrosse partial, and if your kid is a very good student to boot "committing to the academic merit scholarship process" is a walk off home run versus a come with $1,500-$20,000 scholarship being amortized out by a lacrosse coach.
5. No wait, this is the part where anonymous dads post that is just not true, their kid is getting a full ride!!!!!!!!! When one of you guys meets another lacrosse parent of a committed 2017 or 2018 who IS NOT getting a full ride, be sure and let us know. There is not such a thing I know of.

As a practical matter, as parents we'd be better parents if we take the game back from the salesmen in the lacrosse trade. 12-18 year old kids deserve enjoyment and their own fulfillment out of sports and it is silly to take it away from them for a Twitter banner that may read Johnny Lax, XYZ HS 2018, Johns Hopkins 2022. When I was a freshman in high school I don't think I ever thought of what the calendar year of my college graduation would be and would have needed to look it up. I wasn't the brightest kid, but I was normal to not think about that. What 2018 lacrosse kid doesn't know without thinking or counting he is a 2022 college year?


Tend to agree with many of your points, however, you also say a few things that are not applicable to most. First, most of the people reading this are not going to get any $ for need based financial aid. Great for you if you can, but not in the cards for the majority.

Second, merit based $, again, about half the schools don't offer merit based money. The schools that do and that also offer lax money are far and few between. SO the dream is for your kid to get a school that is a great academic institution with a 25% lax ride and a 25% merit based (grades) ride.

Mine also has verballed and all the schools we talked to were the ones where we could make the money work. So, unlike everyone else that is so concerned with whether mine really fits into the school, I am more and was more concerned with how much debt he would graduate having to repay. Our choice was simple (yes, since I am paying it was our choice, not only his), can we get better than a SUNY school at a better price... We were fortunate enough to do so.

Like you, we have heard of the mythical full ride for lax, perhaps it exists, but wasn't offered to mine at any of the four schools we considered.

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great post!!!!!!!!!

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The fact that most parents of committed lax players is that they receive no money! Most early commits get to commit because it costs the coach nothing! The parents are more than willing to pay for everything to tell everyone that there son has committed to a D1 school and that he received a full ride.

It's pretty sad and pathetic but it's the truth.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
The fact that most parents of committed lax players is that they receive no money! Most early commits get to commit because it costs the coach nothing! The parents are more than willing to pay for everything to tell everyone that there son has committed to a D1 school and that he received a full ride.

It's pretty sad and pathetic but it's the truth.


I believe this to be the reality. I hear too many "full ride" stories to believe, and not just in lacrosse. There's not that much money out there. <cue the "my kid got a full ride posters>

As for the early commits transferring, that will be something to watch and track. I don't think 9th and 10th graders can make a sound choice, but I don't think 11th and 12th graders are reliable either. They're still kids. What do they know about life and careers and what the whole college experience will be like? It's a crap shoot. One of my kids had a lifelong career in mind, choose her college accordingly -- and then choose a new career at the end of sophomore year! Doh! You just don't know, they just don't know, you play it as it comes.

As for transferring, be aware that there are NCAA restrictions. I'm not fully conversant on these but you may have to sit out a year, you may need your coach's consent, you may be penalized by your coach if you discuss it with him/her and don't go through with it (seen that secondhand). Transferring is, of course, a possibility, but it's not as easy as just deciding to do so.

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What happens with the kids who get hurt (torn ACL, etc.) after committing? Is the commitment honored? Even if they're not the same player afterwards?

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
What happens with the kids who get hurt (torn ACL, etc.) after committing? Is the commitment honored? Even if they're not the same player afterwards?


Sad thing is I believe we will need to wait to see. A kid gets hurt senior year after his NLI I believe there is insurance policies that the NCAA schools can make claims to so that a scholarship dollar can be used again without hurting the kid who received the scholarship. Before NLI, it is a coach's discretion. One certain high profile football coach is looking like scum publicly in the news in recent days over flopping on a recruit. I think if you have a 9th grader and he hurts his knee this year, isn't the same again...early verbal or no don't be expecting anything more than a admissions spot provided he meets the academic criteria. I don't think lacrosse coaches will look like bad guys for doing it when we get to that point, but that is just a guess.

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i think it is important to realize that a full ride in lax is beyond rare. I played with Dom Starsia at Brown and remain in close contact. He is now in his 23rd year as head coach of VIrginia. In that time he has given 4 one year full rides and all 4 of those cases were not because of the players skill. You have as much chance to win powerball tonight as your son does of getting a full ride to play lax (unless for army, navy or air force) Grades will help you get into a better school but watch what you wish for. It is very hard to balance academics, lax, and social life.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
What happens with the kids who get hurt (torn ACL, etc.) after committing? Is the commitment honored? Even if they're not the same player afterwards?
My kid tore his ACL his freshamn Spring and was close to committing. Just coming back now for his H.S. season. Coaches move on unless they can see you play, that is just the reality. If alreeady committed, they typically will honoe the commitment unless of academics or the kid just really can't play b/c of the injury.

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Originally Posted by Powderfinger
Originally Posted by Anonymous
The fact that most parents of committed lax players is that they receive no money! Most early commits get to commit because it costs the coach nothing! The parents are more than willing to pay for everything to tell everyone that there son has committed to a D1 school and that he received a full ride.

It's pretty sad and pathetic but it's the truth.


I believe this to be the reality. I hear too many "full ride" stories to believe, and not just in lacrosse. There's not that much money out there. <cue the "my kid got a full ride posters>

As for the early commits transferring, that will be something to watch and track. I don't think 9th and 10th graders can make a sound choice, but I don't think 11th and 12th graders are reliable either. They're still kids. What do they know about life and careers and what the whole college experience will be like? It's a crap shoot. One of my kids had a lifelong career in mind, choose her college accordingly -- and then choose a new career at the end of sophomore year! Doh! You just don't know, they just don't know, you play it as it comes.

As for transferring, be aware that there are NCAA restrictions. I'm not fully conversant on these but you may have to sit out a year, you may need your coach's consent, you may be penalized by your coach if you discuss it with him/her and don't go through with it (seen that secondhand). Transferring is, of course, a possibility, but it's not as easy as just deciding to do so.


I agree with most of your comments. Most of the early commits I know including mine are not getting a full ride. Numbers are generally around 20-30%.

As far as transferring, that would happen only after you actually matriculated to a school, so I don't think it is relevant to the early commit conversation at all. Presumably, the early commit offer was accepted, then a letter of intent signed knowing exactly what the numbers are, who the coach is and assuming the kid still wants to go to that school. If after he shows up and decides he doesn't like it and wants to transfer, the same rules apply whether the kid was an early commit or a late one. Not part of the thought process (nor should it be) when the 9th or 10th grader commits...


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Originally Posted by Anonymous
The fact that most parents of committed lax players is that they receive no money! Most early commits get to commit because it costs the coach nothing! The parents are more than willing to pay for everything to tell everyone that there son has committed to a D1 school and that he received a full ride.

It's pretty sad and pathetic but it's the truth.


You are obviously making this up. the top schools that are engaging in the early commit process are all giving money for lax. That doesn't mean full ride, that means a partial.

Plenty of other d-1 schools do not give lax money (think patriot league) but that is also why they are not committing 9th graders. The early kids are going committing to schools that have offered money...

I have had two go through this process and would love to know what you are seeing that is different? Perhaps you are just spreading rumors and have no first had experience? Or, please share which of the early commit schools are not giving money?

Michigan, JHU, Virginia, UNC, Ohio, Penn State, Loyola...all giving money for lax.


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some really great posts. I am not a fan of the early commitment. there are more and more early commitments in girls lacrosse some as early as 8th or 9th grade to d1 schools that are recruiting 12 new players each year. I have looked at some of the D1 rosters this year and the future commitments to these schools and i was surprised to see such large numbers of kids on each team. Some are at the 50 player mark. this to me means that 30 of those kids will never see the field this year. is that fair to the girls? they will practice very hard and miss many days of school just to say they played at the d1 level. the coaches are over recruiting and the parents are not really doing there homework on these schools. my daughter plays d3 lacrosse and enjoys the game. they miss very few days of school and almost all the players play. which is a nice thing to see since they all work very hard. everyone needs to remember that once lacrosse in college is over for these girls they will need to find a job which is why i feel getting a degree is more important than lacrosse and at a d3 level it is more manageable for the Student /Athlete.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
I have seen many examples of early verbals at my son's club, his prep school, his prep league and amongst rival clubs and in the prep or public HS leagues around here. My son also got Twitter friendly with out of area kids from other elite clubs. He is a 2017 and was "not committed" until recently and now is what we maybe could call a "non-public verbal" to a school that is no fan of early announcements of these things. Fine with our family and our club owner has been pleasantly cool about it, but I am always both amazed and dismayed how many times other parental inquiring minds who want to know ask what is wrong with our son because he seems to be a decent player but is not committed. What is wrong? He gets it from his friends and takes it well considering he is 15. But this wears and wears on the kids who are checking the Twitter constantly to measure up who is getting committed versus who isn't. Let's be blunt here: if your 2017 or 2018 son needs to be committed in a month or your family is headed into therapy for clinical depression, here is my recruiting guide:
1. Get your club owner to dial up some 8th tier academic school that has "D1 lacrosse" status bar and beg the coach for a spot. If the kid is an ok player Furman, Bellarmine, Mt. St. Marys, UMBC and the like will take him, especially if you don't get all pedantic about scholarship money. Costs them nothing for something and a lof of college coaches are going in for that now. Rosters closing in on 60...half the kids can't play, no problem. It isn't like the school won't be getting 30 full tuition paying students. Nobody is the victim.
2. Go upmarket and beg beg beg beg a top 20 D1 program via the club and prep school coaches who can shove your kid down a coach's throat as a nothing attached verbal. No money, just a spot please. A shocking number of top 20 program coaches will humor this. See #1. And Ty Xanders is confused why JHU is carrying 6 goalies?!? Seems more and more like he doesn't have a clue about recruiting and it is supposedly his profession.
3. Once your kid is verballed, by all means that opens the sieve for you -- the parent -- to not shop it, but also entertain what other offers may come 1-3 years later. If the kid is a great student and was committed to Furman but Duke calls, well, duhhhh who is throwing a rock at your kid or you for playing the game? I honestly think that 8th or 9th or even 10th grade verbals are considered at least in part "placeholders" to lock in a status, be viewed more favorably by parent or kid peers (and is very very important to both), get your kid ranked by some recruiting guide guy and to honey pot more bees to offer your kid later.
4. The draconian route, ignore it. Implore your kid to enjoy playing club and HS and do your best to teach your son that if he really really wants to play D1 lacrosse he can walk right on at the D1 schools that a cat who isn't dead yet could be admitted to and no coach won't love a capable practice player or will the bursars office at that university. If by now you have not figured out the economics of lacrosse, let me explain it very simply: if you need financial help to put your kid through college you are better off "committing to the financial aid process" than taking a lacrosse partial, and if your kid is a very good student to boot "committing to the academic merit scholarship process" is a walk off home run versus a come with $1,500-$20,000 scholarship being amortized out by a lacrosse coach.
5. No wait, this is the part where anonymous dads post that is just not true, their kid is getting a full ride!!!!!!!!! When one of you guys meets another lacrosse parent of a committed 2017 or 2018 who IS NOT getting a full ride, be sure and let us know. There is not such a thing I know of.

As a practical matter, as parents we'd be better parents if we take the game back from the salesmen in the lacrosse trade. 12-18 year old kids deserve enjoyment and their own fulfillment out of sports and it is silly to take it away from them for a Twitter banner that may read Johnny Lax, XYZ HS 2018, Johns Hopkins 2022. When I was a freshman in high school I don't think I ever thought of what the calendar year of my college graduation would be and would have needed to look it up. I wasn't the brightest kid, but I was normal to not think about that. What 2018 lacrosse kid doesn't know without thinking or counting he is a 2022 college year?


Best post I have ever seen on BOTC. Sounds just like what I have been saying, my son is 2020 and I already know PLENTY of people who are chomping at the bit. Heck, plenty of 2020 kids went to Jake Reed in FL, because don't you know, if you weren't there (and paying A LOT of money to go there), your son WILL NOT get recruited. LOL, the entire thing makes me laugh! People need to relax and enjoy the experience of playing club and not get so wrapped up in who is or is not getting recruited. When the time comes (senior year) the kids will sign (or not sign) and then they will (or will not) play in college. If anyone actually thinks committing in 9th grade means anything, they are fooling themselves.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
The fact that most parents of committed lax players is that they receive no money! Most early commits get to commit because it costs the coach nothing! The parents are more than willing to pay for everything to tell everyone that there son has committed to a D1 school and that he received a full ride.

It's pretty sad and pathetic but it's the truth.


Really?
I happen to know most early commits get money. The reality is quite opposite from your thoughts. It's the minority of early commits that get no money and do so to either play for a team they love even though no money is offered or to "keep up with the Jones'. " The majority of early commits do so to secure some amount of scholarship money. Some very large and some very small and some in the middle.
While we appreciate your opinion it is inaccurate and certainly not the truth. I will leave out the sad and pathetic part.


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How many of the early commits are to ivies?

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
The fact that most parents of committed lax players is that they receive no money! Most early commits get to commit because it costs the coach nothing! The parents are more than willing to pay for everything to tell everyone that there son has committed to a D1 school and that he received a full ride.

It's pretty sad and pathetic but it's the truth.


You are obviously making this up. the top schools that are engaging in the early commit process are all giving money for lax. That doesn't mean full ride, that means a partial.

Plenty of other d-1 schools do not give lax money (think patriot league) but that is also why they are not committing 9th graders. The early kids are going committing to schools that have offered money...

I have had two go through this process and would love to know what you are seeing that is different? Perhaps you are just spreading rumors and have no first had experience? Or, please share which of the early commit schools are not giving money?

Michigan, JHU, Virginia, UNC, Ohio, Penn State, Loyola...all giving money for lax.



I never said that the schools aren't giving scholarships. What I said is that a large amount of the commits are getting nothing so that there parents can tell everyone that they received a full ride to a D1 school. If a big program takes 15 kids in a year they are not al getting money. Half of them at least are getting nothing.

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My daughter verbally committed to a d1 school in tenth grade. 70 percent athletic with the opportunity for some academic money on top of that if she keeps her grades up which she is. No bull [lacrosse]. All truth. We are feeling quite excited for her because although it's not an ivy, it has a very good academic reputation as well.
I don't necessarily agree with what has become of the recruiting proceeds but this was what happened to her. Her particular class has six verbal commits. I will let you know if something goes sour but as for now- driving up and down the coast for four years has paid off.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
My daughter verbally committed to a d1 school in tenth grade. 70 percent athletic with the opportunity for some academic money on top of that if she keeps her grades up which she is. No bull [lacrosse]. All truth. We are feeling quite excited for her because although it's not an ivy, it has a very good academic reputation as well.
I don't necessarily agree with what has become of the recruiting proceeds but this was what happened to her. Her particular class has six verbal commits. I will let you know if something goes sour but as for now- driving up and down the coast for four years has paid off.
CONGRATULATIONS!!! If your daughter is getting 70% at a great school your have just hit the powerball and she is probably in the top 5% of all kids that will play in college. Most will take the 20% offer to play at a weak program with so so academics at a school with a price tag of $50,000 or more. The 95% of us on here could drive from here to florida every weekend but if they weren't born with it all the training in the world isn't going to change a thing

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
First, most of the people reading this are not going to get any $ for need based financial aid. Great for you if you can, but not in the cards for the majority.


Really? good to be you I guess. While many people do not qualify for federal need based grants many private schools with large endowments offer a lot of need based grant money, do you really think every kid on every Ivy League school is paying $60,000 a year out of pocket? they are not. depending on your net worth and income many many kids will do better getting academic and grant money then they could have ever gotten in Athletic and academic money.

And just FYI - for those of us that do qualify for grant money it is not great for us.

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(1) There are only a handful a top universities with huge endowments that offer financial aid / tuition discount if your family income is below $150 - 200K. If your family earns just above that, particularly in a high-cost of living area, very hard to afford. Great schools and great fit if your kid can get in and you qualify for a discount (especially if you are from a low cost of living area).

(2) How are schools allowed to package "merit" aid with athletic scholarships? I realize that a large number of colleges now charge a very high "retail" tuition that only a tiny percentage of students actually pay, using "merit scholarships" as essentially tuition discounts for kids with better grades and scores. So that kind of packaging is not necessarily unfair (or else the athletic scholarship would essentially be worthless), but I would think it would be hard to police schools from essentially using large merit packages as a way around the restriction on athletic scholarships.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
First, most of the people reading this are not going to get any $ for need based financial aid. Great for you if you can, but not in the cards for the majority.


Really? good to be you I guess. While many people do not qualify for federal need based grants many private schools with large endowments offer a lot of need based grant money, do you really think every kid on every Ivy League school is paying $60,000 a year out of pocket? they are not. depending on your net worth and income many many kids will do better getting academic and grant money then they could have ever gotten in Athletic and academic money.

And just FYI - for those of us that do qualify for grant money it is not great for us.


Guess what? It's not great for us paying half our income to taxes. Then paying full tuition, ya know, "cause we're rich". BTW we're not even close to RICH. However, if you make over a certain amount of money the school labels you as rich. Which means we're allowed to pay full boat, so folks like you can get a huge discount. Maybe if everyone paid the same price it wouldn't cost $60k a year, would it now?

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
The fact that most parents of committed lax players is that they receive no money! Most early commits get to commit because it costs the coach nothing! The parents are more than willing to pay for everything to tell everyone that there son has committed to a D1 school and that he received a full ride.

It's pretty sad and pathetic but it's the truth.


You are obviously making this up. the top schools that are engaging in the early commit process are all giving money for lax. That doesn't mean full ride, that means a partial.

Plenty of other d-1 schools do not give lax money (think patriot league) but that is also why they are not committing 9th graders. The early kids are going committing to schools that have offered money...

I have had two go through this process and would love to know what you are seeing that is different? Perhaps you are just spreading rumors and have no first had experience? Or, please share which of the early commit schools are not giving money?

Michigan, JHU, Virginia, UNC, Ohio, Penn State, Loyola...all giving money for lax.



I never said that the schools aren't giving scholarships. What I said is that a large amount of the commits are getting nothing so that there parents can tell everyone that they received a full ride to a D1 school. If a big program takes 15 kids in a year they are not al getting money. Half of them at least are getting nothing.


I guess we can agree and also disagree. I reread your post and you said most early commits receive no money. That is just not true. Most of the early kids receive decent offers, so I disagree. As we move further away from early commits into 11th grade kids verbally committing before signing of the letter of intent, I agree, most of those kids aren't getting much if any money. But it makes sense doesn't it? The schools that have money to give (most schools are not fully funded meaning they have less that 12.5 athletic lax scholarships per year or none at all) are recruiting later in the cycle. It is basic economics, the kids all first look for athletic dollars, so why would Holy cross waste their time trying to recruit a kid that is likely to get $ from somewhere else...

So those schools without money are left to see what kids are left that didn't get money end of 10th beginning of 11th grade.

Also, not trying to offend anyone that goes to any of those schools, they are for the most part great academic institutions anyone should be proud to attend. Also, we all know there will be some late bloomers that get lax money in his senior year because some coach with money absolutely needs that kid for a specific role...but the odds are the earlier the commitment, the better the chances of real $ for lax.

However, the concept of parents lying I happen to agree with. Many parents, even those early commits, get 10-50% lax money, and if they are lucky, some merit money and if they are below a certain income threshold, need based aid. So they say my kid got a full ride. It is not important to them to distinguish between athletic dollars, merit/grade dollars and need based dollars.

I don't choose to argue with them publicly, but the truth is most d-1 lax kids are not getting full rides for lax. The only reason it is important in my mind to this board is so that others, new to the recruiting world, can gauge what to expect and have some education when talking to the coaches.

Merit dollars are the best because they last all four years if the GPA stays above some minimum--usually around a 3.0. Need based are also great, but as has been discussed previously, most people are not getting those dollars with family incomes over $150k. Athletic dollars are year to year, even if the coach is telling you otherwise. He can pull from A and give to B--each is a one year grant...

Been through this twice and believe me or not, I understand all aspects because we have done our homework and I have no reason to lie about it on an anonymous website...

Best of luck to all your kids.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Originally Posted by Anonymous
First, most of the people reading this are not going to get any $ for need based financial aid. Great for you if you can, but not in the cards for the majority.


Really? good to be you I guess. While many people do not qualify for federal need based grants many private schools with large endowments offer a lot of need based grant money, do you really think every kid on every Ivy League school is paying $60,000 a year out of pocket? they are not. depending on your net worth and income many many kids will do better getting academic and grant money then they could have ever gotten in Athletic and academic money.

And just FYI - for those of us that do qualify for grant money it is not great for us.


Look, I wish you all the luck in the world and hope that it all works out for you. Ivy is a lot more difficult than standard and they do have a great system for determining need. But, it is a lot closer to the web based financial aid calculators--publicly available--than you think. Yes, I think people are paying alot for those schools and then some making very little income are going for close to free...If you went to private school in MD--or anywhere else for that matter--you are not getting help from Ivy. Most people in Garden city, manhasett, setauket...are also not getting any help. Good luck to you

I am sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but 10 minutes of research online and you can see what your kid should expect to receive in financial help at any school.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
(1) There are only a handful a top universities with huge endowments that offer financial aid / tuition discount if your family income is below $150 - 200K. If your family earns just above that, particularly in a high-cost of living area, very hard to afford. Great schools and great fit if your kid can get in and you qualify for a discount (especially if you are from a low cost of living area).

(2) How are schools allowed to package "merit" aid with athletic scholarships? I realize that a large number of colleges now charge a very high "retail" tuition that only a tiny percentage of students actually pay, using "merit scholarships" as essentially tuition discounts for kids with better grades and scores. So that kind of packaging is not necessarily unfair (or else the athletic scholarship would essentially be worthless), but I would think it would be hard to police schools from essentially using large merit packages as a way around the restriction on athletic scholarships.


A college can package need based financial aid with merit based aid or athletic money with merit money, they only thing that they cannot do is package need based with athletic money - often times family's will find that they can get more need based money then athletic money - the reason for this is an athlete should not be punished by not being allowed to get merit money.

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Most from LI wont get a sniff of need aid money.

They will qualify for athletic and academic which can be bundled. Example $44,000 Get .25 for athletics which is $11,000 and then a $15,000 for a 1200 SAT and a 95 GPA Nets at $18,000 which is just slightly cheaper than going to Stony Brook or Suny Bing.

The ones who lose are the pure athletic kids that barely hit the academic admission minimums and then just get the .25 with no athletic money.

What no one ever talks about is that they have spent $30,000 or more on club lacrosse to get a $15,000 athletic scholarship

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Most from LI wont get a sniff of need aid money.

They will qualify for athletic and academic which can be bundled. Example $44,000 Get .25 for athletics which is $11,000 and then a $15,000 for a 1200 SAT and a 95 GPA Nets at $18,000 which is just slightly cheaper than going to Stony Brook or Suny Bing.

The ones who lose are the pure athletic kids that barely hit the academic admission minimums and then just get the .25 with no athletic money.

What no one ever talks about is that they have spent $30,000 or more on club lacrosse to get a $15,000 athletic scholarship


Yes, that part is funny...But for my fam, we enjoyed every minute and will be in withdrawal...the whole lax scene will need to be replaced by buying a boat...

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Originally Posted by Anonymous
Most from LI wont get a sniff of need aid money.

They will qualify for athletic and academic which can be bundled. Example $44,000 Get .25 for athletics which is $11,000 and then a $15,000 for a 1200 SAT and a 95 GPA Nets at $18,000 which is just slightly cheaper than going to Stony Brook or Suny Bing.

The ones who lose are the pure athletic kids that barely hit the academic admission minimums and then just get the .25 with no athletic money.
What no one ever talks about is that they have spent $30,000 or more on club lacrosse to get a $15,000 athletic scholarship




Question, when you say merit, lets take UNC and Duke. To get in to either you need to be in the top of your class( as out of state at UNC) with a very high SAT. Kid in my school just who is ranked 7th with a combined SAT 1450 got denied UNC wait listed Duke. To get a merit based money at either of those schools you would need to be something like 1 in your class and 1550 sat or are the standards lower for athletes?

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